Filing Your Taxes Online is Fast, Easy and Secure.
Start now and receive your tax refund in as little as 7 days.

1. Get Answers

Your online questions are customized to your unique tax situation.

2. Maximize your Refund

Find tax credits for everything from school tuition to buying a hybri

3. E-File for FREE

E-file free with direct deposit to get your refund in as few as 7 days.

Filing your taxes with paper mail can be difficult and it could take weeks for your refund to arrive. IRS e-file is easy, fast and secure. There is no paperwork going to the IRS so tax refunds can be processed in as little as 7 days with direct deposit. As you prepare your taxes online, you can see your tax refund in real time.

FREE audit support and representation from an enrolled agent – NEW and only from H&R Block

W 2 Show State Income Tax Withheld

Free Tax Filing 2012File Taxes Free Federal And StateFree Tax FileNeed To File 2011 Tax Return H And R Block1040ez Form 2013 PdfState TaxsFile Past Taxes Online1040ez Form For 2014Filing A Tax Amendment Online1042 Ez2012 Free Tax Software OnlineFreetaxusaFile State Income Tax1040 Tax FormFederal Amended Tax Return2005 Tax FormsHow To File 2011 Tax Return In 2013Download A 1040ez Federal Tax FormFile 2012 Taxes Free OnlineWhere Can I File My State And Federal Taxes For FreeHow To Amend A Tax Return Already Filed1040ez 2012 Tax FormWhere Do I Send My 1040xThere Previous Years Tax Software That FreeHow To Do Tax AmendmentIrs Where Mail 1040ezEfile State Taxes1040 EzFiling Taxes As A Student2012 Federal 1040 Tax FormsFederal Tax 1040ezTaxact 20101040nrezFiling An Amendment To TaxesFillable 1040x FormSenior Tax FilingE File State Taxes For FreeH And R Block 2012 Tax ReturnTax Credits For Unemployed2010 1040ez

W 2 Show State Income Tax Withheld

W 2 show state income tax withheld Index A Affected taxpayer, Affected taxpayer. W 2 show state income tax withheld B Book inventories, charitable deduction for, Charitable Deduction for Contributions of Book Inventories to Public Schools C Cancellation of indebtedness, Exclusion of Certain Cancellations of Indebtedness by Reason of Hurricane Katrina Casualty and theft losses, Casualty and Theft Losses Charitable contributions, Temporary Suspension of Limits on Charitable Contributions Charitable deduction: Book inventory, Charitable Deduction for Contributions of Book Inventories to Public Schools Food inventory, Charitable Deduction for Contributions of Food Inventory Child tax credit, Earned Income Credit and Child Tax Credit Clean-up costs, Demolition and Clean-up Costs Copy of tax return, request for, Request for copy of tax return. W 2 show state income tax withheld Core disaster area, Gulf Opportunity (GO) Zone (Core Disaster Area) Covered disaster area: Katrina, Katrina Covered Disaster Area Rita, Hurricane Rita Disaster Area (Rita Covered Disaster Area) Wilma, Wilma Covered Disaster Area Credits: Child tax, Earned Income Credit and Child Tax Credit Earned income, Earned Income Credit and Child Tax Credit Education, Education Credits Employee retention, Employee Retention Credit Hurricane Katrina housing, Hurricane Katrina Housing Credit Rehabilitation tax, Increase in Rehabilitation Tax Credit Work opportunity, Work Opportunity Credit D Deadlines, extended, Extended Tax Deadlines Demolition costs, Demolition and Clean-up Costs Depreciation: Qualified GO Zone property, Qualified GO Zone property. W 2 show state income tax withheld Special allowance, Special Depreciation Allowance Disaster area: Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Katrina Disaster Area Hurricane Rita, Hurricane Rita Disaster Area (Rita Covered Disaster Area) Hurricane Wilma, Hurricane Wilma Disaster Area Distributions: Home purchase or construction, Repayment of Qualified Distributions for the Purchase or Construction of a Main Home Qualified hurricane, Qualified hurricane distribution. W 2 show state income tax withheld Repayment of, Repayment of Qualified Hurricane Distributions Taxation of, Taxation of Qualified Hurricane Distributions E Earned income credit, Earned Income Credit and Child Tax Credit Education credits, Education Credits Eligible retirement plan, Eligible retirement plan. W 2 show state income tax withheld Employee retention credit, Employee Retention Credit Exemption, additional for housing, Additional Exemption for Housing Individuals Displaced by Hurricane Katrina F Federal mortgage subsidy, recapture of, Recapture of Federal Mortgage Subsidy Food inventory, charitable deduction for, Charitable Deduction for Contributions of Food Inventory G Gulf Opportunity (GO) Zone, Gulf Opportunity (GO) Zone (Core Disaster Area) H Help: How to get, How To Get Tax Help Phone number, How To Get Tax Help Special IRS assistance, How To Get Tax Help Website, How To Get Tax Help Hope credit (see Education credits) Hurricane Katrina disaster area, Hurricane Katrina Disaster Area Hurricane Katrina housing credit, Hurricane Katrina Housing Credit Hurricane Rita disaster area, Hurricane Rita Disaster Area (Rita Covered Disaster Area) Hurricane Wilma disaster area, Hurricane Wilma Disaster Area I Involuntary conversion (see Replacement period for nonrecognition of gain) IRAs and other retirement plans, IRAs and Other Retirement Plans L Lifetime learning credit (see Education credits) M Mileage reimbursements, charitable volunteers, Mileage Reimbursements to Charitable Volunteers N Net operating losses, Net Operating Losses Q Qualified GO Zone loss, Qualified GO Zone loss. W 2 show state income tax withheld Qualified hurricane distribution, Qualified hurricane distribution. W 2 show state income tax withheld R Reforestation costs, Reforestation Costs Rehabilitation tax credit, Increase in Rehabilitation Tax Credit Relocation, temporary, Tax Relief for Temporary Relocation Replacement period for nonrecognition of gain, Replacement Period for Nonrecognition of Gain Retirement plan, eligible, Eligible retirement plan. W 2 show state income tax withheld Retirement plans, IRAs and Other Retirement Plans Rita GO Zone, Rita GO Zone S Section 179 deduction, Increased Section 179 Deduction Standard mileage rate, charitable use, Standard Mileage Rate for Charitable Use of Vehicles T Tax return: Request for copy, Request for copy of tax return. W 2 show state income tax withheld Request for transcript, Request for transcript of tax return. W 2 show state income tax withheld Taxpayer Advocate, Contacting your Taxpayer Advocate. W 2 show state income tax withheld Temporary relocation, Tax Relief for Temporary Relocation Theft losses, Casualty and Theft Losses Timber: 5-year NOL carryback, 5-year NOL carryback of certain timber losses. W 2 show state income tax withheld Reforestation costs, Reforestation Costs Transcript of tax return, request for, Request for transcript of tax return. W 2 show state income tax withheld W Wilma GO Zone, Wilma GO Zone Work opportunity credit, Work Opportunity Credit Prev  Up     Home   More Online Publications
Print - Click this link to Print this page

Sale of Assets Financed with Tax-Exempt Bonds by State and Local Governments and 501(c)(3) Organizations

Tax Exempt Bonds (“TEB”) focuses on providing participants in the municipal bond industry with quality service to assist issuers and conduit borrowers in understanding their tax responsibilities. TEB has initiated an outreach and educational services program to increase understanding and compliance with tax law applicable to tax-exempt bonds. As part of this service TEB is providing the following information with respect to the sale of property financed by tax-exempt bonds. Governmental issuers and 501(c)(3) organizations may use this information to establish practices to monitor tax compliance throughout the period that their bonds are outstanding. This information is not intended to be cited as an authoritative source. TEB recommends that issuers and 501(c)(3) organizations review this basic information concerning remedial actions in consultation with their counsel.

For remedial action with respect to exempt facility bonds, see section 1.142-2 of the Income Tax Regulations (the “Regulations”), and for build America bonds, see IRM 7.2.3.1.2.3.

Generally

To raise needed funds, state and local governments and 501(c)(3) organizations may plan to sell property financed with tax-exempt bonds. The sale of such property could cause the bond issue to become taxable. A timely remedial action, if necessary, will help ensure that the interest on the bond issue remains tax-exempt.

There are three basic remedial action options as generally described below:

  • Redemption or defeasance of nonqualified bonds
  • Alternative use of disposition proceeds
  • Alternative use of facility

Governmental Bonds Example

A governmental bond is one that is not a private activity bond. A bond is a private activity bond if both: (i) more than 10% of the proceeds of a bond issue are used for a private business use (the private business use test); and (ii) more than 10% of the debt service on the bonds is directly or indirectly secured by an interest in property or payments with respect to property used for a private business use or derived from payments in respect of property used for a private business use (the private security or payment test). The sale of bond-financed property, a “deliberate action,” may cause the bond issue to meet both of these tests.

Private business use, generally, is use directly or indirectly in a trade or business carried on by any person other than a governmental unit. The result of meeting both the private business use test and the private security or payment test (together, the private business tests) is that the tax-exempt bond issue becomes a taxable private activity bond.

An example of when governmental bonds are likely to meet the private business tests is the sale of a tax-exempt bond financed facility to a corporation. The sale is a deliberate action because the sale was within the issuer’s control. Depending on how much of the proceeds of the bond issue that the issuer used to construct or acquire the facility and how long after the bonds are issued that the sale occurs, the private business use test may be met since the purchaser is not a governmental entity. If the present value of the sales price is greater than 10% of the present value of the debt service on the bonds, the private security or payment test is met. If the revenues from the facility were pledged as security for the payment of debt service on the bonds and are expected to be more than 10% of the present value of the debt service, the private security or payment test is met (regardless of the sales price to the new purchaser). If the bond issue meets both the private business use test and the private security or payment test, the bonds are taxable unless remedial action is taken as described below.

Qualified 501(c)(3) Bonds Example

If the bonds financing the property are qualified 501(c)(3) bonds, the private business use test threshold of 10% is reduced to 5%. The 5% is further reduced by the percentage of proceeds of the bonds used to pay costs of issuance. (Up to 2% of the proceeds may be used for costs of issuance.) Additionally, use of tax-exempt bond financed property in an unrelated trade or business of any 501(c)(3) organization, as described in section 513 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”), is considered private business use and counts toward the 5% limit.

An example of qualified 501(c)(3) bonds likely to meet the private business tests is the sale of tax-exempt bond financed land to a taxable corporation. The sale is a deliberate action because the sale was within the issuer’s (or 501(c)(3) borrower’s) control. Depending on how much of the proceeds of the bond issue that the issuer or 501(c)(3) borrower used to construct or acquire the facility and how long after the bonds are issued that the sale occurs, the private business use test may be met since the purchaser is not a governmental entity or a 501(c)(3) organization. If the parcel of land sold was pledged as security for the payment of debt service on the bonds, the private security or payment test is met if the sales price is more than 5% of the present value of the debt service on the bonds. If the revenues from the facility were pledged as security for the payment of debt service on the bonds and are expected to be more than 5% of the present value of the debt service, the private security or payment test is met (regardless of the sales price to the new purchaser). If the bond issue meets both the private business use test and the private security or payment test, the bonds are taxable unless remedial action is taken as described below.

A qualified 501(c)(3) bond is one where, among other requirements, the tax-exempt bond financed property is owned by a 501(c)(3) organization or a governmental unit. An example of qualified 501(c)(3) bonds failing to meet this requirement is the sale of the tax-exempt bond financed land to a taxable corporation. Accordingly, the bonds are taxable unless remedial action is taken as described below.

Remedial Action under the Treasury Regulations

The Regulations permit an issuer to take remedial action to preclude the sale of tax-exempt bond financed assets from causing the bonds to become taxable bonds. There are five basic conditions that an issuer must meet to qualify to take a remedial action. The conditions are:

  • The issuer must have reasonably expected on the issue date that the bonds would not meet either the applicable private business tests (including the ownership test for qualified 501(c)(3) bonds) or the private loan financing test for the entire term of the bonds.
  • The term of the bonds must not be longer than reasonably necessary for the qualified purposes of the issue (as a guideline, the term is not greater than 120% of the average reasonably expected economic life of the financed property).
  • Generally, the terms of a sale must be a bona fide and arm’s-length arrangement for fair market value.
  • Disposition proceeds must be treated as gross proceeds for arbitrage and rebate purposes. Disposition proceeds are any amounts, including property, derived from the sale, exchange or other disposition of the tax-exempt bond financed property.
  • Except for a remedial action involving the redemption or defeasance of nonqualified bonds, the proceeds must have been spent on a qualified purpose before the date of the deliberate action, that is, the sale of the bond-financed assets.

Redemption or Defeasance of Nonqualified Bonds

Generally, in the case of a sale of bond-financed property, the nonqualified bonds are the portion of the outstanding bonds equal to the percentage of the proceeds of the bond issue that financed that property. For example, if 50% of the proceeds of a bond issue financed the sold property, the nonqualified bonds equal 50% of the outstanding bonds of the issue at the time of the sale.

The first type of remedial action available is the redemption or defeasance of all of the nonqualified bonds within 90 days of the deliberate action. (Generally, proceeds of another issue of tax-exempt bonds may not be used for this redemption.) If the disposition proceeds are all cash, the issuer need not redeem or defease all of the nonqualified bonds, but must use all of the disposition proceeds to redeem a pro rata portion of nonqualified bonds. The redemption must be on the earliest call date after the deliberate action, or if the earliest call date is more than 90 days after the deliberate action, the issuer must establish a defeasance escrow within 90 days of the deliberate action. Defeasance is only permitted as a remedial action if the first call date is no more than 10 ½ years from the issue date of the bonds. The issuer must provide written notice to the Commissioner of the escrow within 90 days of its establishment.

Alternative Use of Disposition Proceeds

The second type of remedial action, available when the seller receives only cash, allows the issuer to spend the disposition proceeds within two years of the date of the sale for an alternative qualifying use. The issuer must treat the disposition proceeds as proceeds of the bonds, and must not take any action after the date of the sale to cause either the applicable private business use tests or the private loan financing test to be met. (If the bonds are qualified 501(c)(3) bonds, the disposition proceeds must be used for a qualified purpose under section 145 of the Code.) If the issuer does not expect the full amount of the disposition proceeds to be spent for a qualifying purpose within the two year period, it must use the balance of disposition proceeds to redeem (or defease) nonqualified bonds as allowed for the first type of remedial action described above.

Note: If the proceeds of a governmental bond issue are to be subsequently used by a 501(c)(3) organization, remediation by spending the disposition proceeds for an alternate use requires that the nonqualified bonds satisfy all the requirements for qualified 501(c)(3) bonds beginning on the date of the sale.

Alternative Use of Facility

The third type of remedial action available to the issuer is when the tax-exempt financed facility will be used after the sale for a purpose that is a qualifying purpose for another type of tax-exempt bonds (provided that the purchaser of the facility does not use tax-exempt bond proceeds for its purchase). The nonqualified bonds must satisfy all the requirements for the alternate type of tax-exempt bonds beginning on the date of the sale. The issuer must either apply any disposition proceeds resulting from the sale to pay the debt service on the bonds on the next available payment date or deposit the proceeds into an escrow within 90 days of their receipt. If the issuer must establish an escrow, the investment yield on the disposition proceeds must be restricted to the yield on the bonds and the escrow used to pay debt service on the next available payment date.

Allocation of Disposition Proceeds

For all three remedial actions, if the property was financed by different sources, the issuer must first allocate disposition proceeds to the outstanding bonds in proportion to the principal amounts of the outstanding bonds. If the disposition proceeds are not greater than the principal amount of outstanding bonds allocated to the sold property, the proceeds must first be allocated to the outstanding bonds before allocating to bonds no longer outstanding or to sources not derived from borrowing (such as revenues of the issuer).

Remedial Actions-Examples

The following examples assume that the above-described five conditions for remedial action are satisfied. Also, in these examples, no bond proceeds were used for costs of issuance or to fund a reserve fund.


Example 1. - Disposition proceeds are less than the principal amount of the outstanding bonds allocated to the sold property.

Issuer issues $10 million of bonds to finance the construction of a community center. Issuer later sells the center for $5 million, its fair market value. At this time, all $10 million of the bonds are still outstanding. The issuer may choose to remediate by using all $5 million of disposition proceeds to redeem within 90 days or establish a defeasance escrow for a pro rata portion of the $10 million of nonqualified bonds. The remaining outstanding $5 million of bonds would not be private activity bonds because the issuer has remediated as required by the Regulations.

Or, the issuer could remediate by using the alternative use of disposition proceeds option. Under this option, the issuer must apply the total amount of disposition proceeds, $5 million, to a qualifying alternative use within two years (or use a combination of the alternative use of disposition proceeds and redemption or defeasance options).

The disposition proceeds are considered gross proceeds of the bonds and as such are subject to the applicable yield restriction and arbitrage rebate rules pending their use as described above.

Example 2.- Disposition proceeds are greater than the principal amount of the outstanding bonds allocated to the sold property.

Issuer issues $10 million of bonds to finance a school and land. Issuer subsequently sells a portion of the land for $3 million. At this time, all $10 million of the bonds are still outstanding. The principal amount of outstanding bonds allocated to the sold property is $2 million. If the issuer chooses to remediate by redeeming bonds, it must redeem $2 million of outstanding bonds leaving the issuer with $1 million of gross proceeds.

Or, the issuer could remediate by using the alternative use of disposition proceeds option. If so, the Issuer must apply the total amount of the disposition proceeds, $3 million, to a qualifying use within two years (or use a combination of the alternative use of disposition proceeds and redemption or defeasance options).

The disposition proceeds are considered gross proceeds of the bonds and as such are subject to the applicable yield restriction and arbitrage rebate rules pending their use as described above.

Example 3. - Disposition proceeds are greater than the principal amount of the outstanding bonds allocated to the sold property and the conduit borrower finances the project in part with tax-exempt bond proceeds and in part with an equity contribution.

A 501(c)(3) conduit borrower contributed $4 million of cash from its revenues and used $6 million of tax-exempt bonds to finance a $10 million acquisition of a continuing care facility. Subsequently, the conduit borrower sells the facility for $12 million. At this time, all $6 million of the bonds are still outstanding. Thus the issuer has $6 million of nonqualified bonds. The issuer may remediate by either redeeming all of the $6 million nonqualified bonds or by requiring the conduit borrower to use $12 million of disposition proceeds for an alternative use within two years (provided all requirements of qualified 501(c)(3) bonds are met).

Of the $12 million of disposition proceeds, $6 million are considered gross proceeds of the bonds and as such are subject to the applicable yield restriction and arbitrage rebate rules pending their use as described above.

Gross Proceeds - Example 2 versus Example 3

When the tax-exempt bond financed property is sold for an amount in excess of the principal amount of the outstanding bonds allocated to that property, a different result occurs with respect to that excess amount depending on whether all the bonds of the issue have been redeemed. In Example 3, where the issuer redeemed all of the outstanding bonds, the remaining disposition proceeds are not gross proceeds of the bonds and, therefore, are no longer subject to the federal tax restrictions. This is because the amount of gross proceeds cannot exceed the amount of the outstanding bonds of the issue. Whereas in Example 2, although the issuer has redeemed the nonqualified bonds, the issuer still has bonds of the issue outstanding and thus the additional disposition proceeds are gross proceeds of the bonds and subject to the applicable yield restriction and arbitrage rebate rules pending their use.

Correction of Violations Using TEB Voluntary Closing Agreement Program (VCAP)

If an issuer or conduit borrower discovers that it has sold bond financed assets causing the applicable private business tests to be met but is ineligible to self-correct through a remedial action provision, TEB encourages the issuer to take advantage of its Voluntary Closing Agreement Program (TEB VCAP) to resolve federal tax violations relating to bonds as described in Notice 2008-31 and IRM section 7.2.3.

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 04-Sep-2013

The W 2 Show State Income Tax Withheld

W 2 show state income tax withheld It is critical that business owners correctly determine whether the individuals providing services are employees or independent contractors. W 2 show state income tax withheld Generally, you must withhold income taxes, withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare taxes, and pay unemployment tax on wages paid to an employee. You do not generally have to withhold or pay any taxes on payments to independent contractors. W 2 show state income tax withheld Select the Scenario that Applies to You: W 2 show state income tax withheld I am an independent contractor or in business for myself W 2 show state income tax withheld If you are a business owner or contractor who provides services to other businesses, then you are generally considered self-employed. For more information on your tax obligations if you are self-employed (an independent contractor), see our Self-Employed Tax Center. W 2 show state income tax withheld I hire or contract with individuals to provide services to my business W 2 show state income tax withheld If you are a business owner hiring or contracting with other individuals to provide services, you must determine whether the individuals providing services are employees or independent contractors. Follow the rest of this page to find out more about this topic and what your responsibilities are. W 2 show state income tax withheld Determining Whether the Individuals Providing Services are Employees or Independent Contractors W 2 show state income tax withheld Before you can determine how to treat payments you make for services, you must first know the business relationship that exists between you and the person performing the services. The person performing the services may be - W 2 show state income tax withheld An independent contractor W 2 show state income tax withheld An employee (common-law employee) W 2 show state income tax withheld A statutory employee W 2 show state income tax withheld A statutory nonemployee W 2 show state income tax withheld In determining whether the person providing service is an employee or an independent contractor, all information that provides evidence of the degree of control and independence must be considered. W 2 show state income tax withheld Common Law Rules W 2 show state income tax withheld Facts that provide evidence of the degree of control and independence fall into three categories: W 2 show state income tax withheld Behavioral: Does the company control or have the right to control what the worker does and how the worker does his or her job? W 2 show state income tax withheld Financial: Are the business aspects of the worker’s job controlled by the payer? (these include things like how worker is paid, whether expenses are reimbursed, who provides tools/supplies, etc.) W 2 show state income tax withheld Type of Relationship: Are there written contracts or employee type benefits (i.e. pension plan, insurance, vacation pay, etc.)? Will the relationship continue and is the work performed a key aspect of the business? W 2 show state income tax withheld Businesses must weigh all these factors when determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. Some factors may indicate that the worker is an employee, while other factors indicate that the worker is an independent contractor. There is no “magic” or set number of factors that “makes” the worker an employee or an independent contractor, and no one factor stands alone in making this determination. Also, factors which are relevant in one situation may not be relevant in another. W 2 show state income tax withheld The keys are to look at the entire relationship, consider the degree or extent of the right to direct and control, and finally, to document each of the factors used in coming up with the determination. W 2 show state income tax withheld Form SS-8 W 2 show state income tax withheld If, after reviewing the three categories of evidence, it is still unclear whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor, Form SS-8, Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding (PDF) can be filed with the IRS. The form may be filed by either the business or the worker. The IRS will review the facts and circumstances and officially determine the worker’s status. W 2 show state income tax withheld Be aware that it can take at least six months to get a determination, but a business that continually hires the same types of workers to perform particular services may want to consider filing the Form SS-8 (PDF).