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Student Filing Taxes 2013

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Student Filing Taxes 2013

Student filing taxes 2013 Publication 523 - Introductory Material Table of Contents Future Developments Reminders IntroductionOrdering forms and publications. Student filing taxes 2013 Tax questions. Student filing taxes 2013 Useful Items - You may want to see: Future Developments For the latest information about developments related to Publication 523, such as legislation enacted after it was published, go to www. Student filing taxes 2013 irs. Student filing taxes 2013 gov/pub523. Student filing taxes 2013 Reminders Change of address. Student filing taxes 2013  If you change your mailing address, be sure to notify the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) using Form 8822, Change of Address. Student filing taxes 2013 Mail it to the Internal Revenue Service Center for your old address. Student filing taxes 2013 (Addresses for the Service Centers are on the back of the form. Student filing taxes 2013 ) Home sold with undeducted points. Student filing taxes 2013  If you have not deducted all the points you paid to secure a mortgage on your old home, you may be able to deduct the remaining points in the year of sale. Student filing taxes 2013 See Points in Publication 936, Home Mortgage Interest Deduction. Student filing taxes 2013 Photographs of missing children. Student filing taxes 2013  The Internal Revenue Service is a proud partner with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Student filing taxes 2013 Photographs of missing children selected by the Center may appear in this publication on pages that would otherwise be blank. Student filing taxes 2013 You can help bring these children home by looking at the photographs and calling 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) if you recognize a child. Student filing taxes 2013 Introduction This publication explains the tax rules that apply when you sell your main home. Student filing taxes 2013 In most cases, your main home is the one in which you live most of the time. Student filing taxes 2013 If you sold your main home in 2013, you may be able to exclude from income any gain up to a limit of $250,000 ($500,000 on a joint return in most cases). Student filing taxes 2013 See Excluding the Gain , later. Student filing taxes 2013 Generally, if you can exclude all the gain, you do not need to report the sale on your tax return. Student filing taxes 2013 If you have gain that cannot be excluded, you generally must report it on Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets, and Schedule D (Form 1040), Capital Gains and Losses. Student filing taxes 2013 You may also have to complete Form 4797, Sales of Business Property. Student filing taxes 2013 See Reporting the Sale , later. Student filing taxes 2013 If you have a loss on the sale, you generally cannot deduct it on your return. Student filing taxes 2013 However, you may need to report it. Student filing taxes 2013 See Reporting the Sale , later. Student filing taxes 2013 The main topics in this publication are: Figuring gain or loss, Basis, Excluding the gain, Ownership and use tests, and Reporting the sale. Student filing taxes 2013 Other topics include: Business use or rental of home, Deducting taxes in the year of sale, and Recapturing a federal mortgage subsidy. Student filing taxes 2013 Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT). Student filing taxes 2013   If any part of the gain on the sale of a home is not excluded under the rules discussed in this publication, it may be subject to the NIIT. Student filing taxes 2013 For more details, see Form 8960, Net Investment Income Tax—Individuals, Estates, and Trusts, and its instructions. Student filing taxes 2013 Worksheets. Student filing taxes 2013   Near the end of this publication you will find worksheets you can use to figure your gain (or loss) and your exclusion. Student filing taxes 2013 Use Worksheet 1 to figure the adjusted basis of the home you sold. Student filing taxes 2013 Use Worksheet 2 to figure the gain (or loss), the exclusion, and the taxable gain (if any) on the sale. Student filing taxes 2013 If you do not qualify for the maximum exclusion, use Worksheet 3 to figure your reduced maximum exclusion. Student filing taxes 2013 Date of sale. Student filing taxes 2013    If you received a Form 1099-S, Proceeds From Real Estate Transactions, the date of sale should be shown in box 1. Student filing taxes 2013 If you did not receive this form, the date of sale is the earlier of (a) the date title transferred or (b) the date the economic burdens and benefits of ownership shifted to the buyer. Student filing taxes 2013 In most cases, these dates are the same. Student filing taxes 2013 What is not covered in this publication. Student filing taxes 2013   This publication does not cover the sale of rental property, second homes, or vacation homes. Student filing taxes 2013 For information on how to report any gain or loss from those sales, see Publication 544, Sales and Other Dispositions of Assets. Student filing taxes 2013 Comments and suggestions. Student filing taxes 2013   We welcome your comments about this publication and your suggestions for future editions. Student filing taxes 2013   You can write to us at the following address: Internal Revenue Service Tax Forms and Publications Division 1111 Constitution Ave. Student filing taxes 2013 NW, IR-6526 Washington, DC 20224   We respond to many letters by telephone. Student filing taxes 2013 Therefore, it would be helpful if you would include your daytime phone number, including the area code, in your correspondence. Student filing taxes 2013   You can send your comments from www. Student filing taxes 2013 irs. Student filing taxes 2013 gov/formspubs/. Student filing taxes 2013 Click on “More Information” and then on “Comment on Tax Forms and Publications”. Student filing taxes 2013   Although we cannot respond individually to each comment received, we do appreciate your feedback and will consider your comments as we revise our tax products. Student filing taxes 2013 Ordering forms and publications. Student filing taxes 2013   Visit www. Student filing taxes 2013 irs. Student filing taxes 2013 gov/formspubs/ to download forms and publications, call 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676), or write to the address below and receive a response within 10 days after your request is received. Student filing taxes 2013 Internal Revenue Service 1201 N. Student filing taxes 2013 Mitsubishi Motorway Bloomington, IL 61705-6613 Tax questions. Student filing taxes 2013   If you have a tax question, check the information available on IRS. Student filing taxes 2013 gov or call 1-800-829-1040. Student filing taxes 2013 We cannot answer tax questions sent to either of the above addresses. Student filing taxes 2013 Useful Items - You may want to see: Publication 527 Residential Rental Property 530 Tax Information for Homeowners 544 Sales and Other Dispositions of Assets 547 Casualties, Disasters, and Thefts 551 Basis of Assets 587 Business Use of Your Home 936 Home Mortgage Interest Deduction 4681 Canceled Debts, Foreclosures, Repossessions, and Abandonments Form (and Instructions) Schedule A (Form 1040) Itemized Deductions Schedule D (Form 1040) Capital Gains and Losses 982 Reduction of Tax Attributes Due to Discharge of Indebtedness 1040 U. Student filing taxes 2013 S. Student filing taxes 2013 Individual Income Tax Return 1040NR U. Student filing taxes 2013 S. Student filing taxes 2013 Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return 1040X Amended U. Student filing taxes 2013 S. Student filing taxes 2013 Individual Income Tax Return 1099-S Proceeds From Real Estate Transactions 4797 Sales of Business Property 5405 Repayment of the First-Time Homebuyer Credit 8822 Change of Address 8828 Recapture of Federal Mortgage Subsidy 8939 Allocation of Increase in Basis for Property Acquired From a Decedent 8949 Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets W-2 Wage and Tax Statement See How To Get Tax Help , near the end of this publication, for information about getting these publications and forms. Student filing taxes 2013 Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications

Topic 303 - Checklist of Common Errors When Preparing Your Tax Return

Before filing your return, review it to make sure it is correct and complete. The following checklist may help you to avoid common errors:

  • Did you consider filing your tax return electronically? By electronically filing your tax return, many common errors may be avoided or corrected by the computer software. Depending on your income, you may even qualify to e-file for free by using Free File tax software. For more information, visit the IRS website at www.irs.gov and click on the e-file logo on our home page.
  • Did you clearly print your name, social security number, and address, including ZIP code directly on your return? Note that if you are married but filing a separate return, do not include your spouse's name in the name, address and social security number fields on the return.
  • Did you enter the names and social security numbers for yourself, your spouse (if filing jointly), your dependents, and qualifying children for the earned income credit or child tax credit, exactly as those names and numbers appear on each person's social security card? If there have been any name changes be sure to contact the Social Security Administration at www.ssa.gov or call at 800-772-1213.
  • Did you check only one filing status?
  • Did you check the appropriate exemption boxes and enter the names and social security numbers exactly as those names and numbers appear on each person's social security card, for all dependents you claimed? Is the total number of exemptions entered?
  • Did you enter income, deductions, and credits on the correct lines and are the totals correct?
  • If you show a negative amount on your return, did you put brackets around it?
  • If you are taking the standard deduction and checked any box indicating either you or your spouse were age 65 or older or blind, did you find the correct standard deduction using the chart in the Form 1040 Instructions (PDF) or the Form 1040A Instructions (PDF)?
  • Did you figure the tax correctly? If you used the tax tables, did you use the correct column for your filing status?
  • Did you sign and date the return? If it is a joint return, did your spouse also sign and date the return?
  • Do you have a Form W-2 (PDF) from each of your employers and did you attach Copy B of each Form W-2 to your return? If you have more than one job, combine the wages and withholdings from all Form W-2s you receive and report those amounts on one return.
  • Did you attach each Form 1099-R (PDF) that shows federal tax was withheld?
  • Did you attach all other necessary schedules and forms in sequence number order as shown in the upper right-hand corner?
  • Did you use the correct mailing address from your tax form instructions?
  • Did you use a postage stamp on the envelope?
  • If you owe tax, did you enclose a check or money order made payable to the "United States Treasury" with the return and include your name, address, social security number, daytime telephone number, tax form, and tax year on the payment? For additional information, refer to Topic 158.
  • If you are due a refund and requested direct deposit, did you check your financial institution's routing and account numbers?
  • Did you make a copy of the signed return and all schedules for your records?

A few of the most common errors are:

  1. Incorrect or missing social security numbers.
  2. Incorrect tax entered based on taxable income and filing status.
  3. Computation errors in figuring the taxable income, withholding and estimated tax payments, earned income credit, standard deduction for age 65 or over or blind, the taxable amount of social security benefits, and child and dependent care credit. Also, missing or incorrect identification numbers for child care providers.
  4. Withholding and estimated tax payments entered on the wrong line.
  5. Math errors, both addition and subtraction.

It is important that you review your entire return because any errors may delay the processing of your return.

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: January 22, 2014

The Student Filing Taxes 2013

Student filing taxes 2013 Publication 530 - Additional Material Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications