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File 2011 Tax

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File 2011 Tax

File 2011 tax How To Get Tax Help Table of Contents You can get help with unresolved tax issues, order free publications and forms, ask tax questions, and get more information from the IRS in several ways. File 2011 tax By selecting the method that is best for you, you will have quick and easy access to tax help. File 2011 tax Contacting your Taxpayer Advocate. File 2011 tax   If you have attempted to deal with an IRS problem unsuccessfully, you should contact your Taxpayer Advocate. File 2011 tax   The Taxpayer Advocate represents your interests and concerns within the IRS by protecting your rights and resolving problems that have not been fixed through normal channels. File 2011 tax While Taxpayer Advocates cannot change the tax law or make a technical tax decision, they can clear up problems that resulted from previous contacts and ensure that your case is given a complete and impartial review. File 2011 tax   To contact your Taxpayer Advocate: Call the Taxpayer Advocate at 1–877–777–4778. File 2011 tax Call the IRS at 1–800–829–1040. File 2011 tax Call, write, or fax the Taxpayer Advocate office in your area. File 2011 tax Call 1–800–829–4059 if you are a TTY/TDD user. File 2011 tax   For more information, see Publication 1546, The Taxpayer Advocate Service of the IRS. File 2011 tax Free tax services. File 2011 tax   To find out what services are available, get Publication 910, Guide to Free Tax Services. File 2011 tax It contains a list of free tax publications and an index of tax topics. File 2011 tax It also describes other free tax information services, including tax education and assistance programs and a list of TeleTax topics. File 2011 tax Personal computer. File 2011 tax With your personal computer and modem, you can access the IRS on the Internet at www. File 2011 tax irs. File 2011 tax gov. File 2011 tax While visiting our web site, you can: Find answers to questions you may have. File 2011 tax Download forms and publications or search for forms and publications by topic or keyword. File 2011 tax View forms that may be filled in electronically, print the completed form, and then save the form for recordkeeping. File 2011 tax View Internal Revenue Bulletins published in the last few years. File 2011 tax Search regulations and the Internal Revenue Code. File 2011 tax Receive our electronic newsletters on hot tax issues and news. File 2011 tax Get information on starting and operating a small business. File 2011 tax You can also reach us with your computer using File Transfer Protocol at ftp. File 2011 tax irs. File 2011 tax gov. File 2011 tax TaxFax Service. File 2011 tax Using the phone attached to your fax machine, you can receive forms and instructions by calling 703–368–9694. File 2011 tax Follow the directions from the prompts. File 2011 tax When you order forms, enter the catalog number for the form you need. File 2011 tax The items you request will be faxed to you. File 2011 tax For help with transmission problems, call the FedWorld Help Desk at 703–487–4608. File 2011 tax Phone. File 2011 tax Many services are available by phone. File 2011 tax Ordering forms, instructions, and publications. File 2011 tax Call 1–800–829–3676 to order current and prior year forms, instructions, and publications. File 2011 tax Asking tax questions. File 2011 tax Call the IRS with your tax questions at 1–800–829–1040. File 2011 tax TTY/TDD equipment. File 2011 tax If you have access to TTY/TDD equipment, call 1–800–829–4059 to ask tax questions or to order forms and publications. File 2011 tax TeleTax topics. File 2011 tax Call 1–800–829–4477 to listen to pre-recorded messages covering various tax topics. File 2011 tax Evaluating the quality of our telephone services. File 2011 tax To ensure that IRS representatives give accurate, courteous, and professional answers, we evaluate the quality of our telephone services in several ways. File 2011 tax A second IRS representative sometimes monitors live telephone calls. File 2011 tax That person only evaluates the IRS assistor and does not keep a record of any taxpayer's name or tax identification number. File 2011 tax We sometimes record telephone calls to evaluate IRS assistors objectively. File 2011 tax We hold these recordings no longer than one week and use them only to measure the quality of assistance. File 2011 tax We value our customers' opinions. File 2011 tax Throughout this year, we will be surveying our customers for their opinions on our service. File 2011 tax Walk-in. File 2011 tax You can walk in to many post offices, libraries, and IRS offices to pick up certain forms, instructions, and publications. File 2011 tax Some IRS offices, libraries, grocery stores, copy centers, city and county governments, credit unions, and office supply stores have an extensive collection of products available to print from a CD-ROM or photocopy from reproducible proofs. File 2011 tax Also, some IRS offices and libraries have the Internal Revenue Code, regulations, Internal Revenue Bulletins, and Cumulative Bulletins available for research purposes. File 2011 tax Mail. File 2011 tax You can send your order for forms, instructions, and publications to the Distribution Center nearest to you and receive a response within 10 workdays after your request is received. File 2011 tax Find the address that applies to your part of the country. File 2011 tax Western part of U. File 2011 tax S. File 2011 tax : Western Area Distribution Center Rancho Cordova, CA 95743–0001 Central part of U. File 2011 tax S. File 2011 tax : Central Area Distribution Center P. File 2011 tax O. 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Trusts

It is a common misconception that trusts, or trust funds as they are commonly called, are only useful for wealthy people. When set up properly, trusts can be appropriate for people with minor children or those who want to avoid having their estate go through probate upon death. These are basic facts about trusts – but, be sure to consult a licensed attorney experienced with estate planning and trust matters before making any final decisions about if one is right for you.

How Trusts Work

Creating a trust (or trust fund) establishes a legal entity that holds property or assets for the person who created it. The person who creates the trust can be called a grantor, donor, or settlor. When the grantor creates the trust he or she appoints a person or entity (like the trust department of a bank) to manage the trust. This person or entity is called a trustee. The grantor also chooses someone who will ultimately benefit from the trust, this person is the beneficiary. In some situations the grantor, trustee, and beneficiary are all the same person. In this case, the grantor should also appoint a successor trustee and beneficiary in case he or she dies or becomes incapacitated. A trust is a helpful estate planning tool because after death a trust doesn’t go through the probate process like a will does.

Reasons To Set Up A Trust

Some common reasons for setting up a trust include:

  • Providing for minor children or family members who are inexperienced or unable to handle financial matters
  • Providing for management of personal assets should one become unable to handle them oneself
  • Avoiding probate and immediately transferring assets to beneficiaries upon death
  • Reducing estate taxes and providing liquid assets to help pay for them
  • The terms of a will are public while the terms of a trust are not so privacy makes a trust an attractive option

Types of Trusts

Trusts can be living (inter vivos) or after-death (testamentary). A living trust is one that a grantor sets up while still alive and an after-death trust is usually established by a will after one’s death. Living trusts can be irrevocable (can’t be changed) or revocable (can be changed) although revocable trusts don’t receive the same tax shelter benefits as irrevocable ones do. The most popular type is the revocable living trust. If there’s a specific purpose in mind for the trust, dozens of different options exist. Some examples include charitable trusts, bypass trusts, spendthrift trusts, and life insurance trusts. New laws have even established a trust that will care for a pet after one’s death.

Setting Up A Trust

Once you’ve decided to set up a trust it is important to remember that a trust, by design, can be very flexible and a grantor has the right – and should take advantage of this right - within the law, to tailor it to meet the anticipated the needs of the beneficiary. Working with an experienced attorney that specializes in estate and trust issues and knows the specific state regulations can help get the maximum benefit from the trust.
Some things to consider when setting up the trust include:

  • The grantor has the right to specify exactly how the money in the trust is invested. The grantor and the trustee might have very different ideas about investment strategies, so make sure this gets clearly defined.
  • The grantor has the right to specify exactly how the assets should be divvied up down to details like including an annual cost of living adjustment for the beneficiary or paying for travel expenses for others to visit the beneficiary in the case of illness.
  • Always be sure to include a “trustee removal clause” – trusts that don’t have this clause take away the beneficiary’s right to fire the trustee if unsatisfied with the service being provided. Remember that the grantor can always add a provision that requires the beneficiary to select a new trustee from legitimate bank trust departments. Contact your state Department of Financial Institutions to get a list of licensed trust departments.
  • If the grantor wants to ensure that upon death any assets that remain outside of the trust are transferred to it, he or she should consider having a “pour-over” will to accomplish this.

Upon establishment of the trust the grantor must complete the process of setting up the trust by transferring his or her assets into the trust. Failure to do this properly makes the trust null and void. This means that upon the grantor’s death the state will decide who gets the assets and cares for minor children.

Protect Yourself From Trust Scams and Fraud

If someone approaches you to set up a trust be very cautious. Before signing any papers to create a living trust, will or other kind of trust make sure to explore all options and shop around for this service just as you would for any other. Also:

  • Avoid high-pressure sales tactics and high speed sales pitches.
  • Avoid salespeople who give the impression that AARP is backing or selling the product – AARP does not endorse living trust products.
  • Do your homework and get information about local probate laws from the Clerk or Register of Wills.
  • If someone tries to sell a living trust to you ask if they are an attorney. Some states restrict sales of living trusts by licensed attorneys.
  • If you buy a trust in your home or another location that is not the seller’s permanent place of business remember you are entitled to take advantage of the Cooling Off Rule and cancel the transaction within 3 business days.

The File 2011 Tax

File 2011 tax 1. File 2011 tax   Scholarships, Fellowships, Grants, and Tuition Reductions Table of Contents Reminder Introduction Scholarships and FellowshipsTax-Free Scholarships and Fellowships Taxable Scholarships and Fellowships Reporting Scholarships and Fellowships Other Types of Educational AssistanceFulbright Grants Pell Grants and Other Title IV Need-Based Education Grants Payment to Service Academy Cadets Veterans' Benefits Qualified Tuition Reduction Reminder Individual retirement arrangements (IRAs). File 2011 tax  You can set up and make contributions to an IRA if you receive taxable compensation. File 2011 tax Under this rule, a taxable scholarship or fellowship is compensation only if it is shown in box 1 of your Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement. File 2011 tax For more information about IRAs, see Publication 590. File 2011 tax Introduction This chapter discusses the income tax treatment of various types of educational assistance you may receive if you are studying, teaching, or researching in the United States. File 2011 tax The educational assistance can be for a primary or secondary school, a college or university, or a vocational school. File 2011 tax Included are discussions of: Scholarships, Fellowships, Need-based education grants, such as a Pell Grant, and Qualified tuition reductions. File 2011 tax Many types of educational assistance are tax free if they meet the requirements discussed here. File 2011 tax Special rules apply to U. File 2011 tax S. File 2011 tax citizens and resident aliens who have received scholarships or fellowships for studying, teaching, or researching abroad. File 2011 tax For information about these rules, see Publication 54, Tax Guide for U. File 2011 tax S. File 2011 tax Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad. File 2011 tax Scholarships and Fellowships A scholarship is generally an amount paid or allowed to, or for the benefit of, a student (whether an undergraduate or a graduate) at an educational institution to aid in the pursuit of his or her studies. File 2011 tax A fellowship is generally an amount paid for the benefit of an individual to aid in the pursuit of study or research. File 2011 tax Amount of scholarship or fellowship. File 2011 tax   The amount of a scholarship or fellowship includes the following: The value of contributed services and accommodations. File 2011 tax This includes such services and accommodations as room (lodging), board (meals), laundry service, and similar services or accommodations that are received by an individual as a part of a scholarship or fellowship. File 2011 tax The amount of tuition, matriculation, and other fees that are paid or remitted to the student to aid the student in pursuing study or research. File 2011 tax Any amount received in the nature of a family allowance as a part of a scholarship or fellowship. File 2011 tax Tax-Free Scholarships and Fellowships A scholarship or fellowship is tax free (excludable from gross income) only if you are a candidate for a degree at an eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax A scholarship or fellowship is tax free only to the extent: It does not exceed your expenses; It is not designated or earmarked for other purposes (such as room and board), and does not require (by its terms) that it cannot be used for qualified education expenses; and It does not represent payment for teaching, research, or other services required as a condition for receiving the scholarship. File 2011 tax (But for exceptions, see Payment for services,later. File 2011 tax Use Worksheet 1–1 to figure the amount of a scholarship or fellowship you can exclude from gross income. File 2011 tax Candidate for a degree. File 2011 tax   You are a candidate for a degree if you: Attend a primary or secondary school or are pursuing a degree at a college or university, or Attend an educational institution that: Provides a program that is acceptable for full credit toward a bachelor's or higher degree, or offers a program of training to prepare students for gainful employment in a recognized occupation; and Is authorized under federal or state law to provide such a program and is accredited by a nationally recognized accreditation agency. File 2011 tax Eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax   An eligible educational institution is one whose primary function is the presentation of formal instruction and that normally maintains a regular faculty and curriculum and normally has a regularly enrolled body of students in attendance at the place where it carries on its educational activities. File 2011 tax Qualified education expenses. File 2011 tax   For purposes of tax-free scholarships and fellowships, these are expenses for: Tuition and fees required to enroll at or attend an eligible educational institution, and Course-related expenses, such as fees, books, supplies, and equipment that are required for the courses at the eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax These items must be required of all students in your course of instruction. File 2011 tax Expenses that do not qualify. File 2011 tax   Qualified education expenses do not include the cost of: Room and board, Travel, Research, Clerical help, or Equipment and other expenses that are not required for enrollment in or attendance at an eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax Payment for services. File 2011 tax   Generally, you cannot exclude from your gross income the part of any scholarship or fellowship that represents payment for teaching, research, or other services required as a condition for receiving the scholarship. File 2011 tax This applies even if all candidates for a degree must perform the services to receive the degree. File 2011 tax (See exceptions next. File 2011 tax ) Exceptions. File 2011 tax   You do not have to treat as payment for services the part of any scholarship or fellowship that represents payment for teaching, research, or other services if you receive the amount under: The National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program, or The Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship and Financial Assistance Program. File 2011 tax Example 1. File 2011 tax You received a scholarship of $2,500. File 2011 tax The scholarship was not received under either of the exceptions mentioned above. File 2011 tax As a condition for receiving the scholarship, you must serve as a part-time teaching assistant. File 2011 tax Of the $2,500 scholarship, $1,000 represents payment for teaching. File 2011 tax The provider of your scholarship gives you a Form W-2 showing $1,000 as income. File 2011 tax Your qualified education expenses were at least $1,500. File 2011 tax Assuming that all other conditions are met, $1,500 of your scholarship is tax free. File 2011 tax The $1,000 you received for teaching is taxable. File 2011 tax Example 2. File 2011 tax You are a candidate for a degree at a medical school. File 2011 tax You receive a scholarship (not under either of the exceptions mentioned above) for your medical education and training. File 2011 tax The terms of your scholarship require you to perform future services. File 2011 tax A substantial penalty applies if you do not comply. File 2011 tax The entire amount of your grant is taxable as payment for services in the year it is received. File 2011 tax Athletic Scholarships An athletic scholarship is tax free only if and to the extent it meets the requirements discussed later. File 2011 tax Worksheet 1-1. File 2011 tax    You can use Worksheet 1-1, Taxable Scholarship and Fellowship Income , later, to figure the tax-free and taxable parts of your athletic scholarship. File 2011 tax    Worksheet 1-1. File 2011 tax Taxable Scholarship and Fellowship Income 1. File 2011 tax Enter the total amount of any scholarship or fellowship for 2013. File 2011 tax See Amount of scholarship or fellowship, earlier. File 2011 tax 1. File 2011 tax       If you are a degree candidate at an eligible educational institution, go to line 2. File 2011 tax If you are not a degree candidate at an eligible educational institution, stop here. File 2011 tax The entire amount is taxable. File 2011 tax For information on how to report this amount on your tax return, see Reporting Scholarships and Fellowships , earlier, in this chapter. File 2011 tax       2. File 2011 tax Enter the amount from line 1 that was for teaching, research, or any other services required as a condition for receiving the scholarship. File 2011 tax (Do not include amounts received for these items under the National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program or the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship and Financial Assistance Program. File 2011 tax ) 2. File 2011 tax     3. File 2011 tax Subtract line 2 from line 1 3. File 2011 tax     4. File 2011 tax Enter the amount from line 3 that your scholarship or fellowship required you to use for other than qualified education expenses 4. File 2011 tax     5. File 2011 tax Subtract line 4 from line 3 5. File 2011 tax     6. File 2011 tax Enter the amount of your qualified education expenses 6. File 2011 tax     7. File 2011 tax Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 6. File 2011 tax This amount is the most you can exclude from your gross income (the tax-free part of the scholarship or fellowship) 7. File 2011 tax     8. File 2011 tax Subtract line 7 from line 5 8. File 2011 tax     9. File 2011 tax Taxable part. File 2011 tax Add lines 2, 4, and 8. File 2011 tax See Reporting Scholarships and Fellowships , earlier, for how to report this amount on your tax return 9. File 2011 tax     Taxable Scholarships and Fellowships If and to the extent your scholarship or fellowship does not meet the requirements described earlier, it is taxable and must be included in gross income. File 2011 tax You can use Worksheet 1–1, Taxable Scholarship and Fellowship Income, later, to figure the tax-free and taxable parts of your scholarship or fellowship. File 2011 tax Reporting Scholarships and Fellowships Whether you must report your scholarship or fellowship depends on whether you must file a return and whether any part of your scholarship or fellowship is taxable. File 2011 tax If your only income is a completely tax-free scholarship or fellowship, you do not have to file a tax return and no reporting is necessary. File 2011 tax If all or part of your scholarship or fellowship is taxable and you are required to file a tax return, report the taxable amount as explained below. File 2011 tax You must report the taxable amount whether or not you received a Form W-2. File 2011 tax If you receive an incorrect Form W-2, ask the payer for a corrected one. File 2011 tax For information on whether you must file a return, see Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information, or your income tax form instructions. File 2011 tax How To Report How you report any taxable scholarship or fellowship income depends on which return you file. File 2011 tax Form 1040EZ. File 2011 tax   If you file Form 1040EZ, include the taxable amount in the total on line 1. File 2011 tax If the taxable amount was not reported on Form W-2, also enter “SCH” and the taxable amount in the space to the left of line 1. File 2011 tax Form 1040A. File 2011 tax   If you file Form 1040A, include the taxable amount in the total on line 7. File 2011 tax If the taxable amount was not reported on Form W-2, also enter “SCH” and the taxable amount in the space to the left of line 7. File 2011 tax Form 1040. File 2011 tax   If you file Form 1040, include the taxable amount in the total on line 7. File 2011 tax If the taxable amount was not reported on Form W-2, also enter “SCH” and the taxable amount on the dotted line next to line 7. File 2011 tax Schedule SE (Form 1040). File 2011 tax   To determine your net earnings from self-employment, include amounts you receive under a scholarship as pay for your services that are reported to you on Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income. File 2011 tax If your net earnings are $400 or more, you must pay self-employment tax. File 2011 tax Use Schedule SE, Self-Employment Tax, to figure this tax. File 2011 tax Form 1040NR. File 2011 tax   If you file Form 1040NR, report the taxable amount on line 12. File 2011 tax Generally, you must report the amount shown in box 2 of Form(s) 1042-S, Foreign Person's U. File 2011 tax S. File 2011 tax Source Income Subject to Withholding. File 2011 tax See the Instructions for Form 1040NR for more information. File 2011 tax Form 1040NR-EZ. File 2011 tax   If you file Form 1040NR-EZ, report the taxable amount on line 5. File 2011 tax Generally, you must report the amount shown in box 2 of Form(s) 1042-S. File 2011 tax See the Instructions for Form 1040NR-EZ for more information. File 2011 tax Other Types of Educational Assistance The following discussions deal with other common types of educational assistance. File 2011 tax Fulbright Grants A Fulbright grant is generally treated as a scholarship or fellowship in figuring how much of the grant is tax free. File 2011 tax Pell Grants and Other Title IV Need-Based Education Grants These need-based grants are treated as scholarships for purposes of determining their tax treatment. File 2011 tax They are tax free to the extent used for qualified education expenses during the period for which a grant is awarded. File 2011 tax Payment to Service Academy Cadets An appointment to a United States military academy is not a scholarship or fellowship. File 2011 tax Payment you receive as a cadet or midshipman at an armed services academy is pay for personal services and will be reported to you in box 1 of Form W-2. File 2011 tax Include this pay in your income in the year you receive it unless one of the exceptions, discussed earlier under Payment for services , applies. File 2011 tax Veterans' Benefits Payments you receive for education, training, or subsistence under any law administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) are tax free. File 2011 tax Do not include these payments as income on your federal tax return. File 2011 tax If you qualify for one or more of the education benefits discussed in chapters 2 through 12, you may have to reduce the amount of education expenses qualifying for a specific benefit by part or all of your VA payments. File 2011 tax This applies only to the part of your VA payments that is required to be used for education expenses. File 2011 tax You may want to visit the Veteran's Administration website at www. File 2011 tax gibill. File 2011 tax va. File 2011 tax gov for specific information about the various VA benefits for education. File 2011 tax Example. File 2011 tax You have returned to college and are receiving two education benefits under the latest GI Bill: (1) a $1,534 monthly basic housing allowance (BHA) that is directly deposited to your checking account, and (2) $3,840 paid directly to your college for tuition. File 2011 tax Neither of these benefits is taxable and you do not report them on your tax return. File 2011 tax You also want to claim an American opportunity credit on your return. File 2011 tax You paid $5,000 in qualified education expenses (see chapter 2, American Opportunity Credit , later). File 2011 tax To figure the amount of credit, you must first subtract the $3,840 from your qualified education expenses because this payment under the GI Bill was required to be used for education expenses. File 2011 tax You do not subtract any amount of the BHA because it was paid to you and its use was not restricted. File 2011 tax Qualified Tuition Reduction If you are allowed to study tuition free or for a reduced rate of tuition, you may not have to pay tax on this benefit. File 2011 tax This is called a “tuition reduction. File 2011 tax ” You do not have to include a qualified tuition reduction in your income. File 2011 tax A tuition reduction is qualified only if you receive it from, and use it at, an eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax You do not have to use the tuition reduction at the eligible educational institution from which you received it. File 2011 tax In other words, if you work for an eligible educational institution and the institution arranges for you to take courses at another eligible educational institution without paying any tuition, you may not have to include the value of the free courses in your income. File 2011 tax The rules for determining if a tuition reduction is qualified, and therefore tax free, are different if the education provided is below the graduate level or is graduate education. File 2011 tax You must include in your income any tuition reduction you receive that is payment for your services. File 2011 tax Eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax   An eligible educational institution is one that maintains a regular faculty and curriculum and normally has a regularly enrolled body of students in attendance at the place where it carries on its educational activities. File 2011 tax Officers, owners, and highly compensated employees. File 2011 tax   Qualified tuition reductions apply to officers, owners, or highly compensated employees only if benefits are available to employees on a nondiscriminatory basis. File 2011 tax This means that the tuition reduction benefits must be available on substantially the same basis to each member of a group of employees. File 2011 tax The group must be defined under a reasonable classification set up by the employer. File 2011 tax The classification must not discriminate in favor of owners, officers, or highly compensated employees. File 2011 tax Payment for services. File 2011 tax   Generally, you must include in income the part of any qualified tuition reduction that represents payment for teaching, research, or other services by the student required as a condition of receiving the qualified tuition reduction. File 2011 tax This applies even if all candidates for a degree must perform the services to receive the degree. File 2011 tax (See below for exceptions. File 2011 tax ) Exceptions. File 2011 tax   You do not have to include in income the part of any scholarship or fellowship that represents payment for teaching, research, or other services if you receive the amount under: The National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program, or The Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship and Financial Assistance Program. File 2011 tax Education Below the Graduate Level If you receive a tuition reduction for education below the graduate level (including primary, secondary, or high school), it is a qualified tuition reduction, and therefore tax free, only if your relationship to the educational institution providing the benefit is described below. File 2011 tax You are an employee of the eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax You were an employee of the eligible educational institution, but you retired or left on disability. File 2011 tax You are a widow or widower of an individual who died while an employee of the eligible educational institution or who retired or left on disability. File 2011 tax You are the dependent child or spouse of an individual described in (1) through (3), above. File 2011 tax Child of deceased parents. File 2011 tax   For purposes of the qualified tuition reduction, a child is a dependent child if the child is under age 25 and both parents have died. File 2011 tax Child of divorced parents. File 2011 tax   For purposes of the qualified tuition reduction, a dependent child of divorced parents is treated as the dependent of both parents. File 2011 tax Graduate Education A tuition reduction you receive for graduate education is qualified, and therefore tax free, if both of the following requirements are met. File 2011 tax It is provided by an eligible educational institution. File 2011 tax You are a graduate student who performs teaching or research activities for the educational institution. File 2011 tax You must include in income any other tuition reductions for graduate education that you receive. File 2011 tax How To Report Any tuition reduction that is taxable should be included as wages in box 1 of your Form W-2. File 2011 tax Report the amount from Form W-2, box 1, on line 7 (Form 1040 or Form 1040A) or line 1 (Form 1040EZ). File 2011 tax Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications