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IRS Releases the “Dirty Dozen” Tax Scams for 2014; Identity Theft, Phone Scams Lead List

IR-2014-16, Feb. 19, 2014

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued its annual “Dirty Dozen” list of tax scams, reminding taxpayers to use caution during tax season to protect themselves against a wide range of schemes ranging from identity theft to return preparer fraud.

The Dirty Dozen listing, compiled by the IRS each year, lists a variety of common scams taxpayers can encounter at any point during the year. But many of these schemes peak during filing season as people prepare their tax returns.

"Taxpayers should be on the lookout for tax scams using the IRS name,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “These schemes jump every year at tax time. Scams can be sophisticated and take many different forms. We urge people to protect themselves and use caution when viewing e-mails, receiving telephone calls or getting advice on tax issues.”

Illegal scams can lead to significant penalties and interest and possible criminal prosecution. IRS Criminal Investigation works closely with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to shutdown scams and prosecute the criminals behind them.

The following are the Dirty Dozen tax scams for 2014:

Identity Theft

Tax fraud through the use of identity theft tops this year’s Dirty Dozen list. Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personal information, such as your name, Social Security number (SSN) or other identifying information, without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. In many cases, an identity thief uses a legitimate taxpayer’s identity to fraudulently file a tax return and claim a refund.

The agency’s work on identity theft and refund fraud continues to grow, touching nearly every part of the organization. For the 2014 filing season, the IRS has expanded these efforts to better protect taxpayers and help victims.

The IRS has a special section on IRS.gov dedicated to identity theft issues, including YouTube videos, tips for taxpayers and an assistance guide. For victims, the information includes how to contact the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit. For other taxpayers, there are tips on how taxpayers can protect themselves against identity theft.

Taxpayers who believe they are at risk of identity theft due to lost or stolen personal information should contact the IRS immediately so the agency can take action to secure their tax account. Taxpayers can call the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit at 800-908-4490. More information can be found on the special identity protection page.

Pervasive Telephone Scams

The IRS has seen a recent increase in local phone scams across the country, with callers pretending to be from the IRS in hopes of stealing money or identities from victims.

These phone scams include many variations, ranging from instances from where callers say the victims owe money or are entitled to a huge refund. Some calls can threaten arrest and threaten a driver’s license revocation. Sometimes these calls are paired with follow-up calls from people saying they are from the local police department or the state motor vehicle department.

Characteristics of these scams can include:

  • Scammers use fake names and IRS badge numbers. They generally use common names and surnames to identify themselves.
  • Scammers may be able to recite the last four digits of a victim’s Social Security Number.
  • Scammers “spoof” or imitate the IRS toll-free number on caller ID to make it appear that it’s the IRS calling.
  • Scammers sometimes send bogus IRS emails to some victims to support their bogus calls.
  • Victims hear background noise of other calls being conducted to mimic a call site.

After threatening victims with jail time or a driver’s license revocation, scammers hang up and others soon call back pretending to be from the local police or DMV, and the caller ID supports their claim.

In another variation, one sophisticated phone scam has targeted taxpayers, including recent immigrants, throughout the country. Victims are told they owe money to the IRS and it must be paid promptly through a pre-loaded debit card or wire transfer. If the victim refuses to cooperate, they are then threatened with arrest, deportation or suspension of a business or driver’s license. In many cases, the caller becomes hostile and insulting.

If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS, here’s what you should do: If you know you owe taxes or you think you might owe taxes, call the IRS at 800-829-1040. The IRS employees at that line can help you with a payment issue – if there really is such an issue.

If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to think that you owe any taxes (for example, you’ve never received a bill or the caller made some bogus threats as described above), then call and report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 800-366-4484.

If you’ve been targeted by these scams, you should also contact the Federal Trade Commission and use their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov.  Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments of your complaint.

Phishing

Phishing is a scam typically carried out with the help of unsolicited email or a fake website that poses as a legitimate site to lure in potential victims and prompt them to provide valuable personal and financial information. Armed with this information, a criminal can commit identity theft or financial theft.

If you receive an unsolicited email that appears to be from either the IRS or an organization closely linked to the IRS, such as the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), report it by sending it to phishing@irs.gov.

It is important to keep in mind the IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as text messages and social media channels. The IRS has information online that can help you protect yourself from email scams.

False Promises of “Free Money” from Inflated Refunds

Scam artists routinely pose as tax preparers during tax time, luring victims in by promising large federal tax refunds or refunds that people never dreamed they were due in the first place.

Scam artists use flyers, advertisements, phony store fronts and even word of mouth to throw out a wide net for victims. They may even spread the word through community groups or churches where trust is high. Scammers prey on people who do not have a filing requirement, such as low-income individuals or the elderly. They also prey on non-English speakers, who may or may not have a filing requirement.

Scammers build false hope by duping people into making claims for fictitious rebates, benefits or tax credits. They charge good money for very bad advice. Or worse, they file a false return in a person's name and that person never knows that a refund was paid.

Scam artists also victimize people with a filing requirement and due a refund by promising inflated refunds based on fictitious Social Security benefits and false claims for education credits, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), or the American Opportunity Tax Credit, among others.

The IRS sometimes hears about scams from victims complaining about losing their federal benefits, such as Social Security benefits, certain veteran’s benefits or low-income housing benefits. The loss of benefits was the result of false claims being filed with the IRS that provided false income amounts.

While honest tax preparers provide their customers a copy of the tax return they’ve prepared, victims of scam frequently are not given a copy of what was filed. Victims also report that the fraudulent refund is deposited into the scammer’s bank account. The scammers deduct a large “fee” before cutting a check to the victim, a practice not used by legitimate tax preparers.

The IRS reminds all taxpayers that they are legally responsible for what’s on their returns even if it was prepared by someone else. Taxpayers who buy into such schemes can end up being penalized for filing false claims or receiving fraudulent refunds.

Taxpayers should take care when choosing an individual or firm to prepare their taxes. Honest return preparers generally: ask for proof of income and eligibility for credits and deductions; sign returns as the preparer; enter their IRS Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN); provide the taxpayer a copy of the return.

Beware: Intentional mistakes of this kind can result in a $5,000 penalty.

Return Preparer Fraud

About 60 percent of taxpayers will use tax professionals this year to prepare their tax returns. Most return preparers provide honest service to their clients. But, some unscrupulous preparers prey on unsuspecting taxpayers, and the result can be refund fraud or identity theft.

It is important to choose carefully when hiring an individual or firm to prepare your return. This year, the IRS wants to remind all taxpayers that they should use only preparers who sign the returns they prepare and enter their IRS Preparer Tax Identification Numbers (PTINs).

The IRS also has a web page to assist taxpayers. For tips about choosing a preparer, details on preparer qualifications and information on how and when to make a complaint, view IRS Fact Sheet 2014-5, IRS Offers Advice on How to Choose a Tax Preparer.

Remember: Taxpayers are legally responsible for what’s on their tax return even if it is prepared by someone else. Make sure the preparer you hire is up to the task.

IRS.gov has general information on reporting tax fraud. More specifically, you report abusive tax preparers to the IRS on Form 14157, Complaint: Tax Return Preparer. Download Form 14157 and fill it out or order by mail at 800-TAX FORM (800-829-3676). The form includes a return address.

Hiding Income Offshore

Over the years, numerous individuals have been identified as evading U.S. taxes by hiding income in offshore banks, brokerage accounts or nominee entities and then using debit cards, credit cards or wire transfers to access the funds. Others have employed foreign trusts, employee-leasing schemes, private annuities or insurance plans for the same purpose.

The IRS uses information gained from its investigations to pursue taxpayers with undeclared accounts, as well as the banks and bankers suspected of helping clients hide their assets overseas. The IRS works closely with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to prosecute tax evasion cases.

While there are legitimate reasons for maintaining financial accounts abroad, there are reporting requirements that need to be fulfilled. U.S. taxpayers who maintain such accounts and who do not comply with reporting requirements are breaking the law and risk significant penalties and fines, as well as the possibility of criminal prosecution.

Since 2009, tens of thousands of individuals have come forward voluntarily to disclose their foreign financial accounts, taking advantage of special opportunities to comply with the U.S. tax system and resolve their tax obligations. And, with new foreign account reporting requirements being phased in over the next few years, hiding income offshore is increasingly more difficult.

At the beginning of 2012, the IRS reopened the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP) following continued strong interest from taxpayers and tax practitioners after the closure of the 2011 and 2009 programs. The IRS works on a wide range of international tax issues with DOJ to pursue criminal prosecution of international tax evasion. This program will be open for an indefinite period until otherwise announced.

The IRS has collected billions of dollars in back taxes, interest and penalties so far from people who participated in offshore voluntary disclosure programs since 2009. It is in the best long-term interest of taxpayers to come forward, catch up on their filing requirements and pay their fair share.

Impersonation of Charitable Organizations

Another long-standing type of abuse or fraud is scams that occur in the wake of significant natural disasters.

Following major disasters, it’s common for scam artists to impersonate charities to get money or private information from well-intentioned taxpayers. Scam artists can use a variety of tactics. Some scammers operating bogus charities may contact people by telephone or email to solicit money or financial information. They may even directly contact disaster victims and claim to be working for or on behalf of the IRS to help the victims file casualty loss claims and get tax refunds.

They may attempt to get personal financial information or Social Security numbers that can be used to steal the victims’ identities or financial resources. Bogus websites may solicit funds for disaster victims. The IRS cautions both victims of natural disasters and people wishing to make charitable donations to avoid scam artists by following these tips:

  • To help disaster victims, donate to recognized charities.
  • Be wary of charities with names that are similar to familiar or nationally known organizations. Some phony charities use names or websites that sound or look like those of respected, legitimate organizations. IRS.gov has a search feature, Exempt Organizations Select Check, which allows people to find legitimate, qualified charities to which donations may be tax-deductible.
  • Don’t give out personal financial information, such as Social Security numbers or credit card and bank account numbers and passwords, to anyone who solicits a contribution from you. Scam artists may use this information to steal your identity and money.
  • Don’t give or send cash. For security and tax record purposes, contribute by check or credit card or another way that provides documentation of the gift.

Call the IRS toll-free disaster assistance telephone number (866-562-5227) if you are a disaster victim with specific questions about tax relief or disaster related tax issues.

False Income, Expenses or Exemptions

Another scam involves inflating or including income on a tax return that was never earned, either as wages or as self-employment income in order to maximize refundable credits. Claiming income you did not earn or expenses you did not pay in order to secure larger refundable credits such as the Earned Income Tax Credit could have serious repercussions. This could result in repaying the erroneous refunds, including interest and penalties, and in some cases, even prosecution.

Additionally, some taxpayers are filing excessive claims for the fuel tax credit. Farmers and other taxpayers who use fuel for off-highway business purposes may be eligible for the fuel tax credit. But other individuals have claimed the tax credit although they were not eligible. Fraud involving the fuel tax credit is considered a frivolous tax claim and can result in a penalty of $5,000.

Frivolous Arguments

Promoters of frivolous schemes encourage taxpayers to make unreasonable and outlandish claims to avoid paying the taxes they owe. The IRS has a list of frivolous tax arguments that taxpayers should avoid. These arguments are wrong and have been thrown out of court. While taxpayers have the right to contest their tax liabilities in court, no one has the right to disobey the law or disregard their responsibility to pay taxes.

Those who promote or adopt frivolous positions risk a variety of penalties.  For example, taxpayers could be responsible for an accuracy-related penalty, a civil fraud penalty, an erroneous refund claim penalty, or a failure to file penalty.  The Tax Court may also impose a penalty against taxpayers who make frivolous arguments in court.   

Taxpayers who rely on frivolous arguments and schemes may also face criminal prosecution for attempting to evade or defeat tax. Similarly, taxpayers may be convicted of a felony for willfully making and signing under penalties of perjury any return, statement, or other document that the person does not believe to be true and correct as to every material matter.  Persons who promote frivolous arguments and those who assist taxpayers in claiming tax benefits based on frivolous arguments may be prosecuted for a criminal felony.

Falsely Claiming Zero Wages or Using False Form 1099

Filing a phony information return is an illegal way to lower the amount of taxes an individual owes. Typically, a Form 4852 (Substitute Form W-2) or a “corrected” Form 1099 is used as a way to improperly reduce taxable income to zero. The taxpayer may also submit a statement rebutting wages and taxes reported by a payer to the IRS.

Sometimes, fraudsters even include an explanation on their Form 4852 that cites statutory language on the definition of wages or may include some reference to a paying company that refuses to issue a corrected Form W-2 for fear of IRS retaliation. Taxpayers should resist any temptation to participate in any variations of this scheme. Filing this type of return may result in a $5,000 penalty.

Some people also attempt fraud using false Form 1099 refund claims. In some cases, individuals have made refund claims based on the bogus theory that the federal government maintains secret accounts for U.S. citizens and that taxpayers can gain access to the accounts by issuing 1099-OID forms to the IRS. In this ongoing scam, the perpetrator files a fake information return, such as a Form 1099 Original Issue Discount (OID), to justify a false refund claim on a corresponding tax return.

Don’t fall prey to people who encourage you to claim deductions or credits to which you are not entitled or willingly allow others to use your information to file false returns. If you are a party to such schemes, you could be liable for financial penalties or even face criminal prosecution.

Abusive Tax Structures

Abusive tax schemes have evolved from simple structuring of abusive domestic and foreign trust arrangements into sophisticated strategies that take advantage of the financial secrecy laws of some foreign jurisdictions and the availability of credit/debit cards issued from offshore financial institutions.

IRS Criminal Investigation (CI) has developed a nationally coordinated program to combat these abusive tax schemes. CI's primary focus is on the identification and investigation of the tax scheme promoters as well as those who play a substantial or integral role in facilitating, aiding, assisting, or furthering the abusive tax scheme (e.g., accountants, lawyers).  Secondarily, but equally important, is the investigation of investors who knowingly participate in abusive tax schemes.

What is an abusive scheme? The Abusive Tax Schemes program encompasses violations of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) and related statutes where multiple flow-through entities are used as an integral part of the taxpayer's scheme to evade taxes.  These schemes are characterized by the use of Limited Liability Companies (LLCs), Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs), International Business Companies (IBCs), foreign financial accounts, offshore credit/debit cards and other similar instruments.  The schemes are usually complex involving multi-layer transactions for the purpose of concealing the true nature and ownership of the taxable income and/or assets.

Form over substance are the most important words to remember before buying into any arrangements that promise to "eliminate" or "substantially reduce" your tax liability.  The promoters of abusive tax schemes often employ financial instruments in their schemes.  However, the instruments are used for improper purposes including the facilitation of tax evasion.

The IRS encourages taxpayers to report unlawful tax evasion. Where Do You Report Suspected Tax Fraud Activity?

Misuse of Trusts

Trusts also commonly show up in abusive tax structures. They are highlighted here because unscrupulous promoters continue to urge taxpayers to transfer large amounts of assets into trusts. These assets include not only cash and investments, but also successful on-going businesses. There are legitimate uses of trusts in tax and estate planning, but the IRS commonly sees highly questionable transactions. These transactions promise reduced taxable income, inflated deductions for personal expenses, the reduction or elimination of self-employment taxes and reduced estate or gift transfer taxes. These transactions commonly arise when taxpayers are transferring wealth from one generation to another. Questionable trusts rarely deliver the tax benefits promised and are used primarily as a means of avoiding income tax liability and hiding assets from creditors, including the IRS.

IRS personnel continue to see an increase in the improper use of private annuity trusts and foreign trusts to shift income and deduct personal expenses, as well as to avoid estate transfer taxes. As with other arrangements, taxpayers should seek the advice of a trusted professional before entering a trust arrangement.

The IRS reminds taxpayers that tax scams can take many forms beyond the “Dirty Dozen,” and people should be on the lookout for many other schemes. More information on tax scams is available at IRS.gov.

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Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 21-Feb-2014

The E File 2012 Taxes

E file 2012 taxes Internal Revenue Bulletin:  2010-9  March 1, 2010  Rev. E file 2012 taxes Proc. E file 2012 taxes 2010-18 Table of Contents SECTION 1. E file 2012 taxes PURPOSE SECTION 2. E file 2012 taxes BACKGROUND SECTION 3. E file 2012 taxes SCOPE SECTION 4. E file 2012 taxes APPLICATION SECTION 5. E file 2012 taxes EFFECTIVE DATE SECTION 6. E file 2012 taxes DRAFTING INFORMATION SECTION 1. E file 2012 taxes PURPOSE This revenue procedure provides: (1) limitations on depreciation deductions for owners of passenger automobiles first placed in service by the taxpayer during calendar year 2010, including a separate table of limitations on depreciation deductions for trucks and vans; and (2) the amounts to be included in income by lessees of passenger automobiles first leased by the taxpayer during calendar year 2010, including a separate table of inclusion amounts for lessees of trucks and vans. E file 2012 taxes The tables detailing these depreciation limitations and lessee inclusion amounts reflect the automobile price inflation adjustments required by § 280F(d)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code. E file 2012 taxes SECTION 2. E file 2012 taxes BACKGROUND . E file 2012 taxes 01 For owners of passenger automobiles, § 280F(a) imposes dollar limitations on the depreciation deduction for the year the taxpayer places the passenger automobile in service and for each succeeding year. E file 2012 taxes Section 280F(d)(7) requires the amounts allowable as depreciation deductions to be increased by a price inflation adjustment amount for passenger automobiles placed in service after 1988. E file 2012 taxes The method of calculating this price inflation amount for trucks and vans placed in service in or after calendar year 2003 uses a different CPI “automobile component” (the “new trucks” component) than that used in the price inflation amount calculation for other passenger automobiles (the “new cars” component), resulting in somewhat higher depreciation deductions for trucks and vans. E file 2012 taxes This change reflects the higher rate of price inflation for trucks and vans since 1988. E file 2012 taxes . E file 2012 taxes 02 Section 280F(c) requires a reduction in the deduction allowed to the lessee of a leased passenger automobile. E file 2012 taxes The reduction must be substantially equivalent to the limitations on the depreciation deductions imposed on owners of passenger automobiles. E file 2012 taxes Under § 1. E file 2012 taxes 280F-7(a) of the Income Tax Regulations, this reduction requires a lessee to include in gross income an inclusion amount determined by applying a formula to the amount obtained from a table. E file 2012 taxes One table applies to lessees of trucks and vans and another table applies to all other passenger automobiles. E file 2012 taxes Each table shows inclusion amounts for a range of fair market values for each taxable year after the passenger automobile is first leased. E file 2012 taxes SECTION 3. E file 2012 taxes SCOPE . E file 2012 taxes 01 The limitations on depreciation deductions in section 4. E file 2012 taxes 01(2) of this revenue procedure apply to passenger automobiles (other than leased passenger automobiles) that are placed in service by the taxpayer in calendar year 2010, and continue to apply for each taxable year that the passenger automobile remains in service. E file 2012 taxes . E file 2012 taxes 02 The tables in section 4. E file 2012 taxes 02 of this revenue procedure apply to leased passenger automobiles for which the lease term begins during calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes Lessees of these passenger automobiles must use these tables to determine the inclusion amount for each taxable year during which the passenger automobile is leased. E file 2012 taxes See Rev. E file 2012 taxes Proc. E file 2012 taxes 2005-13, 2005-1 C. E file 2012 taxes B. E file 2012 taxes 759, for passenger automobiles first leased before calendar year 2006; Rev. E file 2012 taxes Proc. E file 2012 taxes 2006-18, 2006-1 C. E file 2012 taxes B. E file 2012 taxes 645, for passenger automobiles first leased during calendar year 2006; Rev. E file 2012 taxes Proc. E file 2012 taxes 2007-30, 2007-1 C. E file 2012 taxes B. E file 2012 taxes 1104, for passenger automobiles first leased during calendar year 2007; Rev. E file 2012 taxes Proc. E file 2012 taxes 2008-22, 2008-12 I. E file 2012 taxes R. E file 2012 taxes B. E file 2012 taxes 658, for passenger automobiles first leased during calendar year 2008; and Rev. E file 2012 taxes Proc. E file 2012 taxes 2009-24, 2009-17 I. E file 2012 taxes R. E file 2012 taxes B. E file 2012 taxes 885, for passenger automobiles first leased during calendar year 2009. E file 2012 taxes SECTION 4. E file 2012 taxes APPLICATION . E file 2012 taxes 01 Limitations on Depreciation Deductions for Certain Automobiles. E file 2012 taxes (1) Amount of the inflation adjustment. E file 2012 taxes (a) Passenger automobiles (other than trucks or vans). E file 2012 taxes Under § 280F(d)(7)(B)(i), the automobile price inflation adjustment for any calendar year is the percentage (if any) by which the CPI automobile component for October of the preceding calendar year exceeds the CPI automobile component for October 1987. E file 2012 taxes The term “CPI automobile component” is defined in § 280F(d)(7)(B)(ii) as the “automobile component” of the Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers published by the Department of Labor. E file 2012 taxes The new car component of the CPI was 115. E file 2012 taxes 2 for October 1987 and 137. E file 2012 taxes 851 for October 2009. E file 2012 taxes The October 2009 index exceeded the October 1987 index by 22. E file 2012 taxes 651. E file 2012 taxes Therefore, the automobile price inflation adjustment for 2010 for passenger automobiles (other than trucks and vans) is 19. E file 2012 taxes 66 percent (22. E file 2012 taxes 651/115. E file 2012 taxes 2 x 100%). E file 2012 taxes The dollar limitations in § 280F(a) are multiplied by a factor of 0. E file 2012 taxes 1966, and the resulting increases, after rounding to the nearest $100, are added to the 1988 limitations to give the depreciation limitations applicable to passenger automobiles (other than trucks and vans) for calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes This adjustment applies to all passenger automobiles (other than trucks and vans) that are first placed in service in calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes (b) Trucks and vans. E file 2012 taxes To determine the dollar limitations for trucks and vans first placed in service during calendar year 2010, the new truck component of the CPI is used instead of the new car component. E file 2012 taxes The new truck component of the CPI was 112. E file 2012 taxes 4 for October 1987 and 140. E file 2012 taxes 897 for October 2009. E file 2012 taxes The October 2009 index exceeded the October 1987 index by 28. E file 2012 taxes 497. E file 2012 taxes Therefore, the automobile price inflation adjustment for 2010 for trucks and vans is 25. E file 2012 taxes 35 percent (28. E file 2012 taxes 497/112. E file 2012 taxes 4 x 100%). E file 2012 taxes The dollar limitations in § 280F(a) are multiplied by a factor of 0. E file 2012 taxes 2535, and the resulting increases, after rounding to the nearest $100, are added to the 1988 limitations to give the depreciation limitations for trucks and vans. E file 2012 taxes This adjustment applies to all trucks and vans that are first placed in service in calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes (2) Amount of the limitation. E file 2012 taxes Tables 1 and 2 contain the dollar amount of the depreciation limitation for each taxable year for passenger automobiles a taxpayer places in service in calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes Use Table 1 for a passenger automobile (other than a truck or van) and Table 2 for a truck or van placed in service in calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes REV. E file 2012 taxes PROC. E file 2012 taxes 2010-18 TABLE 1 DEPRECIATION LIMITATIONS FOR PASSENGER AUTOMOBILES (THAT ARE NOT TRUCKS OR VANS) PLACED IN SERVICE IN CALENDAR YEAR 2010 Tax Year Amount 1st Tax Year $3,060 2nd Tax Year $4,900 3rd Tax Year $2,950 Each Succeeding Year $1,775 REV. E file 2012 taxes PROC. E file 2012 taxes 2010-18 TABLE 2 DEPRECIATION LIMITATIONS FOR TRUCKS AND VANS PLACED IN SERVICE IN CALENDAR YEAR 2010 Tax Year Amount 1st Tax Year $3,160 2nd Tax Year $5,100 3rd Tax Year $3,050 Each Succeeding Year $1,875 . E file 2012 taxes 02 Inclusions in Income of Lessees of Passenger Automobiles. E file 2012 taxes A taxpayer must follow the procedures in § 1. E file 2012 taxes 280F-7(a) for determining the inclusion amounts for passenger automobiles first leased in calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes In applying these procedures, lessees of passenger automobiles other than trucks and vans should use Table 3 of this revenue procedure, while lessees of trucks and vans should use Table 4 of this revenue procedure. E file 2012 taxes REV. E file 2012 taxes PROC. E file 2012 taxes 2010-18 TABLE 3 DOLLAR AMOUNTS FOR PASSENGER AUTOMOBILES (THAT ARE NOT TRUCKS OR VANS) WITH A LEASE TERM BEGINNING IN CALENDAR YEAR 2010 Fair Market Value of Passenger Automobile Tax Year During Lease Over Not Over 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th & Later $16,700 $17,000 3 7 10 11 14 17,000 17,500 4 8 13 15 16 17,500 18,000 5 10 16 19 21 18,000 18,500 6 13 18 23 26 18,500 19,000 7 15 22 26 31 19,000 19,500 8 17 25 30 35 19,500 20,000 9 19 29 34 39 20,000 20,500 10 21 32 38 44 20,500 21,000 11 23 35 42 48 21,000 21,500 12 26 38 45 53 21,500 22,000 13 28 41 50 57 22,000 23,000 14 31 46 56 63 23,000 24,000 16 36 52 63 73 24,000 25,000 18 40 59 71 81 25,000 26,000 20 44 66 78 90 26,000 27,000 22 49 71 86 100 27,000 28,000 24 53 78 94 108 28,000 29,000 26 57 85 101 118 29,000 30,000 28 61 92 109 126 30,000 31,000 30 66 97 117 135 31,000 32,000 32 70 104 125 144 32,000 33,000 34 74 111 132 153 33,000 34,000 36 79 117 140 161 34,000 35,000 38 83 123 148 171 35,000 36,000 40 87 130 156 179 36,000 37,000 42 92 136 163 188 37,000 38,000 44 96 143 170 198 38,000 39,000 46 100 149 179 206 39,000 40,000 48 105 155 186 215 40,000 41,000 50 109 162 194 224 41,000 42,000 52 113 169 201 233 42,000 43,000 54 118 174 210 241 43,000 44,000 56 122 181 217 251 44,000 45,000 58 126 188 225 259 45,000 46,000 60 131 194 232 269 46,000 47,000 61 135 201 240 277 47,000 48,000 63 140 207 248 286 48,000 49,000 65 144 213 256 295 49,000 50,000 67 148 220 263 304 50,000 51,000 69 153 226 271 313 51,000 52,000 71 157 232 279 322 52,000 53,000 73 161 239 287 331 53,000 54,000 75 166 245 294 340 54,000 55,000 77 170 252 302 348 55,000 56,000 79 174 258 310 358 56,000 57,000 81 178 265 318 366 57,000 58,000 83 183 271 325 375 58,000 59,000 85 187 278 333 384 59,000 60,000 87 191 284 341 393 60,000 62,000 90 198 294 352 406 62,000 64,000 94 207 306 368 424 64,000 66,000 98 215 320 382 443 66,000 68,000 102 224 332 398 460 68,000 70,000 106 232 346 413 478 70,000 72,000 110 241 358 429 496 72,000 74,000 114 250 371 444 513 74,000 76,000 118 258 384 460 531 76,000 78,000 122 267 396 476 549 78,000 80,000 126 276 409 491 566 80,000 85,000 132 291 432 518 598 85,000 90,000 142 313 464 556 643 90,000 95,000 152 334 497 594 687 95,000 100,000 162 356 528 634 731 100,000 110,000 177 388 577 691 798 110,000 120,000 196 432 641 768 887 120,000 130,000 216 475 705 846 976 130,000 140,000 236 518 770 922 1,065 140,000 150,000 256 561 834 1,000 1,154 150,000 160,000 275 605 898 1,077 1,243 160,000 170,000 295 648 963 1,153 1,333 170,000 180,000 315 691 1,027 1,231 1,421 180,000 190,000 334 735 1,091 1,308 1,510 190,000 200,000 354 778 1,155 1,386 1,599 200,000 210,000 374 821 1,220 1,462 1,688 210,000 220,000 393 865 1,284 1,539 1,777 220,000 230,000 413 908 1,348 1,617 1,866 230,000 240,000 433 951 1,413 1,693 1,956 240,000 and up 453 995 1,476 1,771 2,044 REV. E file 2012 taxes PROC. E file 2012 taxes 2010-18 TABLE 4 DOLLAR AMOUNTS FOR TRUCKS AND VANS WITH A LEASE TERM BEGINNING IN CALENDAR YEAR 2010 Fair Market Value of Passenger Automobile Tax Year During Lease Over Not Over 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th & Later 17,000 17,500 3 6 9 10 11 17,500 18,000 4 8 12 14 16 18,000 18,500 5 10 15 18 21 18,500 19,000 6 12 19 22 24 19,000 19,500 7 15 21 26 29 19,500 20,000 8 17 25 29 34 20,000 20,500 9 19 28 33 38 20,500 21,000 10 21 31 37 43 21,000 21,500 11 23 35 41 47 21,500 22,000 12 25 38 45 51 22,000 23,000 13 29 42 51 58 23,000 24,000 15 33 49 58 67 24,000 25,000 17 37 56 66 76 25,000 26,000 19 42 62 73 85 26,000 27,000 21 46 68 82 93 27,000 28,000 23 50 75 89 103 28,000 29,000 25 55 81 97 111 29,000 30,000 27 59 88 104 121 30,000 31,000 29 63 94 113 129 31,000 32,000 31 68 100 120 138 32,000 33,000 33 72 107 127 148 33,000 34,000 35 76 114 135 156 34,000 35,000 37 81 119 143 165 35,000 36,000 39 85 126 151 174 36,000 37,000 41 89 133 158 183 37,000 38,000 43 94 139 166 191 38,000 39,000 45 98 145 174 201 39,000 40,000 47 102 152 182 209 40,000 41,000 49 106 159 189 218 41,000 42,000 51 111 164 198 227 42,000 43,000 53 115 171 205 236 43,000 44,000 55 119 178 213 245 44,000 45,000 57 124 184 220 254 45,000 46,000 59 128 190 228 263 46,000 47,000 60 133 197 235 272 47,000 48,000 62 137 203 244 280 48,000 49,000 64 142 209 251 290 49,000 50,000 66 146 216 259 298 50,000 51,000 68 150 223 266 308 51,000 52,000 70 154 229 275 316 52,000 53,000 72 159 235 282 325 53,000 54,000 74 163 242 290 334 54,000 55,000 76 167 249 297 343 55,000 56,000 78 172 254 305 352 56,000 57,000 80 176 261 313 361 57,000 58,000 82 180 268 320 370 58,000 59,000 84 185 274 328 378 59,000 60,000 86 189 280 336 388 60,000 62,000 89 195 291 347 401 62,000 64,000 93 204 303 363 418 64,000 66,000 97 213 315 379 436 66,000 68,000 101 221 329 394 454 68,000 70,000 105 230 341 410 472 70,000 72,000 109 239 354 424 490 72,000 74,000 113 247 367 440 508 74,000 76,000 117 256 380 455 526 76,000 78,000 121 264 393 471 543 78,000 80,000 125 273 406 486 561 80,000 85,000 131 289 428 513 592 85,000 90,000 141 310 461 552 636 90,000 95,000 151 332 492 591 681 95,000 100,000 161 353 525 629 726 100,000 110,000 176 386 573 686 793 110,000 120,000 195 430 637 763 882 120,000 130,000 215 473 701 841 971 130,000 140,000 235 516 766 918 1,059 140,000 150,000 255 559 830 995 1,149 150,000 160,000 274 603 894 1,072 1,238 160,000 170,000 294 646 958 1,150 1,326 170,000 180,000 314 689 1,023 1,226 1,416 180,000 190,000 333 733 1,087 1,303 1,505 190,000 200,000 353 776 1,151 1,381 1,594 200,000 210,000 373 819 1,216 1,457 1,683 210,000 220,000 392 863 1,280 1,534 1,772 220,000 230,000 412 906 1,344 1,612 1,861 230,000 240,000 432 949 1,409 1,689 1,949 240,000 and up 452 992 1,473 1,766 2,039 SECTION 5. E file 2012 taxes EFFECTIVE DATE This revenue procedure applies to passenger automobiles that a taxpayer first places in service or first leases during calendar year 2010. E file 2012 taxes SECTION 6. E file 2012 taxes DRAFTING INFORMATION The principal author of this revenue procedure is Bernard P. E file 2012 taxes Harvey of the Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Income Tax & Accounting). E file 2012 taxes For further information regarding this revenue procedure, contact Mr. E file 2012 taxes Harvey at (202) 622-4930 (not a toll-free call). E file 2012 taxes Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Internal Revenue Bulletins