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2011 Taxes 2013

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2011 Taxes 2013

2011 taxes 2013 20. 2011 taxes 2013   Standard Deduction Table of Contents What's New Introduction Standard Deduction Amount Standard Deduction for Dependents Who Should ItemizeWhen to itemize. 2011 taxes 2013 Married persons who filed separate returns. 2011 taxes 2013 What's New Standard deduction increased. 2011 taxes 2013  The standard deduction for some taxpayers who do not itemize their deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040) is higher for 2013 than it was for 2012. 2011 taxes 2013 The amount depends on your filing status. 2011 taxes 2013 You can use the 2013 Standard Deduction Tables in this chapter to figure your standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 Introduction This chapter discusses the following topics. 2011 taxes 2013 How to figure the amount of your standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 The standard deduction for dependents. 2011 taxes 2013 Who should itemize deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 Most taxpayers have a choice of either taking a standard deduction or itemizing their deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 If you have a choice, you can use the method that gives you the lower tax. 2011 taxes 2013 The standard deduction is a dollar amount that reduces your taxable income. 2011 taxes 2013 It is a benefit that eliminates the need for many taxpayers to itemize actual deductions, such as medical expenses, charitable contributions, and taxes, on Schedule A (Form 1040). 2011 taxes 2013 The standard deduction is higher for taxpayers who: Are 65 or older, or Are blind. 2011 taxes 2013 You benefit from the standard deduction if your standard deduction is more than the total of your allowable itemized deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 Persons not eligible for the standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013   Your standard deduction is zero and you should itemize any deductions you have if: Your filing status is married filing separately, and your spouse itemizes deductions on his or her return, You are filing a tax return for a short tax year because of a change in your annual accounting period, or You are a nonresident or dual-status alien during the year. 2011 taxes 2013 You are considered a dual-status alien if you were both a nonresident and resident alien during the year. 2011 taxes 2013 Note. 2011 taxes 2013 If you are a nonresident alien who is married to a U. 2011 taxes 2013 S. 2011 taxes 2013 citizen or resident alien at the end of the year, you can choose to be treated as a U. 2011 taxes 2013 S. 2011 taxes 2013 resident. 2011 taxes 2013 (See Publication 519, U. 2011 taxes 2013 S. 2011 taxes 2013 Tax Guide for Aliens. 2011 taxes 2013 ) If you make this choice, you can take the standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 If an exemption for you can be claimed on another person's return (such as your parents' return), your standard deduction may be limited. 2011 taxes 2013 See Standard Deduction for Dependents, later. 2011 taxes 2013 Standard Deduction Amount The standard deduction amount depends on your filing status, whether you are 65 or older or blind, and whether an exemption can be claimed for you by another taxpayer. 2011 taxes 2013 Generally, the standard deduction amounts are adjusted each year for inflation. 2011 taxes 2013 The standard deduction amounts for most people are shown in Table 20-1. 2011 taxes 2013 Decedent's final return. 2011 taxes 2013   The standard deduction for a decedent's final tax return is the same as it would have been had the decedent continued to live. 2011 taxes 2013 However, if the decedent was not 65 or older at the time of death, the higher standard deduction for age cannot be claimed. 2011 taxes 2013 Higher Standard Deduction for Age (65 or Older) If you are age 65 or older on the last day of the year and do not itemize deductions, you are entitled to a higher standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 You are considered 65 on the day before your 65th birthday. 2011 taxes 2013 Therefore, you can take a higher standard deduction for 2013 if you were born before January 2, 1949. 2011 taxes 2013 Use Table 20-2 to figure the standard deduction amount. 2011 taxes 2013 Higher Standard Deduction for Blindness If you are blind on the last day of the year and you do not itemize deductions, you are entitled to a higher standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 Not totally blind. 2011 taxes 2013   If you are not totally blind, you must get a certified statement from an eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) that: You cannot see better than 20/200 in the better eye with glasses or contact lenses, or Your field of vision is 20 degrees or less. 2011 taxes 2013   If your eye condition is not likely to improve beyond these limits, the statement should include this fact. 2011 taxes 2013 You must keep the statement in your records. 2011 taxes 2013   If your vision can be corrected beyond these limits only by contact lenses that you can wear only briefly because of pain, infection, or ulcers, you can take the higher standard deduction for blindness if you otherwise qualify. 2011 taxes 2013 Spouse 65 or Older or Blind You can take the higher standard deduction if your spouse is age 65 or older or blind and: You file a joint return, or You file a separate return and can claim an exemption for your spouse because your spouse had no gross income and cannot be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. 2011 taxes 2013 You cannot claim the higher standard deduction for an individual other than yourself and your spouse. 2011 taxes 2013 Examples The following examples illustrate how to determine your standard deduction using Tables 20-1 and 20-2. 2011 taxes 2013 Example 1. 2011 taxes 2013 Larry, 46, and Donna, 33, are filing a joint return for 2013. 2011 taxes 2013 Neither is blind, and neither can be claimed as a dependent. 2011 taxes 2013 They decide not to itemize their deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 They use Table 20-1. 2011 taxes 2013 Their standard deduction is $12,200. 2011 taxes 2013 Example 2. 2011 taxes 2013 The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that Larry is blind at the end of 2013. 2011 taxes 2013 Larry and Donna use Table 20-2. 2011 taxes 2013 Their standard deduction is $13,400. 2011 taxes 2013 Example 3. 2011 taxes 2013 Bill and Lisa are filing a joint return for 2013. 2011 taxes 2013 Both are over age 65. 2011 taxes 2013 Neither is blind, and neither can be claimed as a dependent. 2011 taxes 2013 If they do not itemize deductions, they use Table 20-2. 2011 taxes 2013 Their standard deduction is $14,600. 2011 taxes 2013 Standard Deduction for Dependents The standard deduction for an individual who can be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return is generally limited to the greater of: $1,000, or The individual's earned income for the year plus $350 (but not more than the regular standard deduction amount, generally $6,100). 2011 taxes 2013 However, if the individual is 65 or older or blind, the standard deduction may be higher. 2011 taxes 2013 If you (or your spouse, if filing jointly) can be claimed as a dependent on someone else's return, use Table 20-3 to determine your standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 Earned income defined. 2011 taxes 2013   Earned income is salaries, wages, tips, professional fees, and other amounts received as pay for work you actually perform. 2011 taxes 2013    For purposes of the standard deduction, earned income also includes any part of a scholarship or fellowship grant that you must include in your gross income. 2011 taxes 2013 See Scholarships and fellowships in chapter 12 for more information on what qualifies as a scholarship or fellowship grant. 2011 taxes 2013 Example 1. 2011 taxes 2013 Michael is single. 2011 taxes 2013 His parents can claim an exemption for him on their 2013 tax return. 2011 taxes 2013 He has interest income of $780 and wages of $150. 2011 taxes 2013 He has no itemized deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 Michael uses Table 20-3 to find his standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 He enters $150 (his earned income) on line 1, $500 ($150 + $350) on line 3, $1,000 (the larger of $500 and $1,000) on line 5, and $6,100 on line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 His standard deduction, on line 7a, is $1,000 (the smaller of $1,000 and $6,100). 2011 taxes 2013 Example 2. 2011 taxes 2013 Joe, a 22-year-old full-time college student, can be claimed as a dependent on his parents' 2013 tax return. 2011 taxes 2013 Joe is married and files a separate return. 2011 taxes 2013 His wife does not itemize deductions on her separate return. 2011 taxes 2013 Joe has $1,500 in interest income and wages of $3,800. 2011 taxes 2013 He has no itemized deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 Joe finds his standard deduction by using Table 20-3. 2011 taxes 2013 He enters his earned income, $3,800 on line 1. 2011 taxes 2013 He adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $4,150 on line 3. 2011 taxes 2013 On line 5, he enters $4,150, the larger of lines 3 and 4. 2011 taxes 2013 Because Joe is married filing a separate return, he enters $6,100 on line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 On line 7a he enters $4,150 as his standard deduction because it is smaller than $6,100, the amount on line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 Example 3. 2011 taxes 2013 Amy, who is single, can be claimed as a dependent on her parents' 2013 tax return. 2011 taxes 2013 She is 18 years old and blind. 2011 taxes 2013 She has interest income of $1,300 and wages of $2,900. 2011 taxes 2013 She has no itemized deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 Amy uses Table 20-3 to find her standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 She enters her wages of $2,900 on line 1. 2011 taxes 2013 She adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $3,250 on line 3. 2011 taxes 2013 On line 5, she enters $3,250, the larger of lines 3 and 4. 2011 taxes 2013 Because she is single, Amy enters $6,100 on line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 She enters $3,250 on line 7a. 2011 taxes 2013 This is the smaller of the amounts on lines 5 and 6. 2011 taxes 2013 Because she checked one box in the top part of the worksheet, she enters $1,500 on line 7b. 2011 taxes 2013 She then adds the amounts on lines 7a and 7b and enters her standard deduction of $4,750 on line 7c. 2011 taxes 2013 Example 4. 2011 taxes 2013 Ed is single. 2011 taxes 2013 His parents can claim an exemption for him on their 2013 tax return. 2011 taxes 2013 He has wages of $7,000, interest income of $500, and a business loss of $3,000. 2011 taxes 2013 He has no itemized deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 Ed uses Table 20-3 to figure his standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 He enters $4,000 ($7,000 - $3,000) on line 1. 2011 taxes 2013 He adds lines 1 and 2 and enters $4,350 on line 3. 2011 taxes 2013 On line 5 he enters $4,350, the larger of lines 3 and 4. 2011 taxes 2013 Because he is single, Ed enters $6,100 on line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 On line 7a he enters $4,350 as his standard deduction because it is smaller than $6,100, the amount on line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 Who Should Itemize You should itemize deductions if your total deductions are more than the standard deduction amount. 2011 taxes 2013 Also, you should itemize if you do not qualify for the standard deduction, as discussed earlier under Persons not eligible for the standard deduction . 2011 taxes 2013 You should first figure your itemized deductions and compare that amount to your standard deduction to make sure you are using the method that gives you the greater benefit. 2011 taxes 2013 You may be subject to a limit on some of your itemized deductions if your adjusted gross income is more than: $250,000 if single ($275,000 if head of household, $300,000 if married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er); or $150,000 if married filing separately). 2011 taxes 2013 See chapter 29 or the instructions for Schedule A (Form 1040) for more information on figuring the correct amount of your itemized deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 When to itemize. 2011 taxes 2013   You may benefit from itemizing your deductions on Schedule A (Form 1040) if you: Do not qualify for the standard deduction, or the amount you can claim is limited, Had large uninsured medical and dental expenses during the year, Paid interest and taxes on your home, Had large unreimbursed employee business expenses or other miscellaneous deductions, Had large uninsured casualty or theft losses, Made large contributions to qualified charities, or Have total itemized deductions that are more than the standard deduction to which you otherwise are entitled. 2011 taxes 2013 These deductions are explained in chapters 21–28. 2011 taxes 2013    If you decide to itemize your deductions, complete Schedule A and attach it to your Form 1040. 2011 taxes 2013 Enter the amount from Schedule A, line 29, on Form 1040, line 40. 2011 taxes 2013 Electing to itemize for state tax or other purposes. 2011 taxes 2013   Even if your itemized deductions are less than your standard deduction, you can elect to itemize deductions on your federal return rather than take the standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 You may want to do this if, for example, the tax benefit of itemizing your deductions on your state tax return is greater than the tax benefit you lose on your federal return by not taking the standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 To make this election, you must check the box on line 30 of Schedule A. 2011 taxes 2013 Changing your mind. 2011 taxes 2013   If you do not itemize your deductions and later find that you should have itemized — or if you itemize your deductions and later find you should not have — you can change your return by filing Form 1040X, Amended U. 2011 taxes 2013 S. 2011 taxes 2013 Individual Income Tax Return. 2011 taxes 2013 See Amended Returns and Claims for Refund in chapter 1 for more information on amended returns. 2011 taxes 2013 Married persons who filed separate returns. 2011 taxes 2013   You can change methods of taking deductions only if you and your spouse both make the same changes. 2011 taxes 2013 Both of you must file a consent to assessment for any additional tax either one may owe as a result of the change. 2011 taxes 2013    You and your spouse can use the method that gives you the lower total tax, even though one of you may pay more tax than you would have paid by using the other method. 2011 taxes 2013 You both must use the same method of claiming deductions. 2011 taxes 2013 If one itemizes deductions, the other should itemize because he or she will not qualify for the standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 See Persons not eligible for the standard deduction , earlier. 2011 taxes 2013 2013 Standard Deduction Tables If you are married filing a separate return and your spouse itemizes deductions, or if you are a dual-status alien, you cannot take the standard deduction even if you were born before January 2, 1949, or are blind. 2011 taxes 2013 Table 20-1. 2011 taxes 2013 Standard Deduction Chart for Most People* If your filing status is. 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 Your standard deduction is: Single or Married filing separately $6,100 Married filing jointly or Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child 12,200 Head of household 8,950 *Do not use this chart if you were born before January 2, 1949, are blind, or if someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent. 2011 taxes 2013 Use Table 20-2 or 20-3 instead. 2011 taxes 2013 Table 20-2. 2011 taxes 2013 Standard Deduction Chart for People Born Before January 2, 1949, or Who are Blind Check the correct number of boxes below. 2011 taxes 2013 Then go to the chart. 2011 taxes 2013 You: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Your spouse, if claiming spouse's exemption: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Total number of boxes checked   IF  your filing status is. 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 AND the number in the box above is. 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 THEN your standard deduction is. 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 . 2011 taxes 2013 Single 1 $7,600   2 9,100 Married filing jointly 1 $13,400 or Qualifying 2 14,600 widow(er) with 3 15,800 dependent child 4 17,000 Married filing 1 $7,300 separately 2 8,500   3 9,700   4 10,900 Head of household 1 $10,450   2 11,950 *If someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent, use Table 20-3 instead. 2011 taxes 2013 Table 20-3. 2011 taxes 2013 Standard Deduction Worksheet for Dependents Use this worksheet only if someone else can claim you (or your spouse if filing jointly) as a dependent. 2011 taxes 2013 Check the correct number of boxes below. 2011 taxes 2013 Then go to the worksheet. 2011 taxes 2013 You:   Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Your spouse, if claiming spouse's exemption: Born before January 2, 1949 □ Blind □ Total number of boxes checked 1. 2011 taxes 2013 Enter your earned income (defined below). 2011 taxes 2013 If none, enter -0-. 2011 taxes 2013 1. 2011 taxes 2013   2. 2011 taxes 2013 Additional amount. 2011 taxes 2013 2. 2011 taxes 2013 $350 3. 2011 taxes 2013 Add lines 1 and 2. 2011 taxes 2013 3. 2011 taxes 2013   4. 2011 taxes 2013 Minimum standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 4. 2011 taxes 2013 $1,000 5. 2011 taxes 2013 Enter the larger of line 3 or line 4. 2011 taxes 2013 5. 2011 taxes 2013   6. 2011 taxes 2013 Enter the amount shown below for your filing status. 2011 taxes 2013 Single or Married filing separately—$6,100 Married filing jointly—$12,200 Head of household—$8,950 6. 2011 taxes 2013   7. 2011 taxes 2013 Standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013         a. 2011 taxes 2013 Enter the smaller of line 5 or line 6. 2011 taxes 2013 If born after January 1, 1949, and not blind, stop here. 2011 taxes 2013 This is your standard deduction. 2011 taxes 2013 Otherwise, go on to line 7b. 2011 taxes 2013 7a. 2011 taxes 2013     b. 2011 taxes 2013 If born before January 2, 1949, or blind, multiply $1,500 ($1,200 if married) by the number in the box above. 2011 taxes 2013 7b. 2011 taxes 2013     c. 2011 taxes 2013 Add lines 7a and 7b. 2011 taxes 2013 This is your standard deduction for 2013. 2011 taxes 2013 7c. 2011 taxes 2013   Earned income includes wages, salaries, tips, professional fees, and other compensation received for personal services you performed. 2011 taxes 2013 It also includes any amount received as a scholarship that you must include in your income. 2011 taxes 2013 Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
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Tax Counseling for the Elderly

The Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) program offers FREE tax help to individuals who are age 60 or older. Cooperative grant agreements are entered into between IRS and eligible organizations to provide tax assistance to elderly taxpayers. The funds provided by the IRS are used by organizations to reimburse volunteers for their out-of-pocket expenses; including transportation, meals and other expenses incurred by them in providing tax counseling assistance at locations convenient to the taxpayers.  

Tax return preparation assistance is provided to elderly taxpayers during the normal period for filing Federal income tax returns, which is from January 1 to April 15 each year. However, the program activities required to make sure elderly taxpayers receive efficient and quality tax assistance can be conducted year-round.

A sponsor awarded a grant is responsible for all aspects of operating the TCE program including, but not limited to publicity, recruitment, training, site selection and management of volunteers.  

Section 163 of the Revenue Act of 1978, Public Law No. 95-600, 92 Stat. 2810, November 6, 1978, authorizes IRS to enter into cooperative agreements.

This web page serves as a resource for organizations interested in applying for a TCE grant as well as for organizations who have been awarded a grant.

Select from the following categories to get started:

 

Contact the TCE Grant Program at tce.grant.office@irs.gov

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 11-Sep-2013

The 2011 Taxes 2013

2011 taxes 2013 Index A Additional Medicare Tax, Reminders, Additional Medicare Tax withholding. 2011 taxes 2013 Adjustments, Reporting Adjustments to Form 941-SS, 944-SS, 944, or 943 Agricultural labor, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Aliens, nonresidents, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Assistance (see Tax help) C Calendar, Calendar Comments on publication, Comments and suggestions. 2011 taxes 2013 Common-law employee, Employee status under common law. 2011 taxes 2013 Corrected wage and tax statement, Correcting Forms W-2AS, W-2CM, W-2GU, W-2VI, and Form W-3SS. 2011 taxes 2013 Crew leaders, Farm Crew Leaders Current period adjustments, Current Period Adjustments D Deposit How to deposit, How To Deposit Penalties, Deposit Penalties Period, Deposit Period Requirements, 8. 2011 taxes 2013 Depositing Taxes Rules $100,000 next-day deposit, $100,000 Next-Day Deposit Rule Accuracy of deposits, Accuracy of Deposits Rule Schedules Monthly, Monthly Deposit Schedule Semiweekly, Semiweekly Deposit Schedule When to deposit, When To Deposit E Electronic deposits, Electronic deposit requirement. 2011 taxes 2013 Electronic filing and payment, Reminders Employee, 2. 2011 taxes 2013 Who Are Employees? Employer identification number (EIN), 1. 2011 taxes 2013 Employer Identification Number (EIN) F Family employees, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Farm crew leaders, Farm Crew Leaders Farmworkers, 6. 2011 taxes 2013 Social Security and Medicare Taxes for Farmworkers, Employers of farmworkers. 2011 taxes 2013 Federal employees, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Fishing, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Form, Calendar, Lookback period for employers of nonfarm workers. 2011 taxes 2013 4070, 5. 2011 taxes 2013 Tips 4070A, 5. 2011 taxes 2013 Tips 8274, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 940, Calendar 941-SS, Calendar, Current Period Adjustments 941-X, Adjustments to lookback period taxes. 2011 taxes 2013 943, Calendar 943-X, Adjustments to lookback period taxes. 2011 taxes 2013 944-X, Adjustments to lookback period taxes. 2011 taxes 2013 Schedule H (Form 1040), Household employers reporting social security and Medicare taxes. 2011 taxes 2013 SS-4, 1. 2011 taxes 2013 Employer Identification Number (EIN) SS-5, Reminders, Employee's social security card. 2011 taxes 2013 SS-8, IRS help. 2011 taxes 2013 W-2c, Employee's social security card. 2011 taxes 2013 , Correcting Forms W-2AS, W-2CM, W-2GU, W-2VI, and Form W-3SS. 2011 taxes 2013 Fringe benefits, Fringe Benefits, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 FUTA tax, 11. 2011 taxes 2013 Federal Unemployment (FUTA) Tax—U. 2011 taxes 2013 S. 2011 taxes 2013 Virgin Islands Employers Only G Government employees, nonfederal, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Group-term life insurance, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 H Help (see Tax help) Hiring new employees, Reminders Homeworkers, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Hospital interns, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Household employers, Household employers reporting social security and Medicare taxes. 2011 taxes 2013 Household workers, Household employers reporting social security and Medicare taxes. 2011 taxes 2013 , Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 How to deposit, How To Deposit I Insurance agents, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 IRS help (employee v. 2011 taxes 2013 subcontractor), IRS help. 2011 taxes 2013 L Lookback period Farmworkers, Lookback period for employers of farmworkers. 2011 taxes 2013 Nonfarm workers, Lookback period for employers of nonfarm workers. 2011 taxes 2013 M Meals and lodging, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Ministers, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Monthly deposit schedule, Monthly Deposit Schedule Moving expenses, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 N Newspaper delivery, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Noncash payments, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Nonprofit organizations, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 P Partners, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Penalties, Deposit Penalties Pension plans, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Prior period adjustments, Prior Period Adjustments Private delivery services, Reminders Publications (see Tax help) R Recordkeeping, Reminders Religious orders, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Retirement and pension plans, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 S Salespersons, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Scholarships and fellowships, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Semiweekly deposit schedule, Semiweekly Deposit Schedule Severance pay, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Sick pay, Sick pay. 2011 taxes 2013 , Sick pay payments. 2011 taxes 2013 , Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Social security number (SSN), 3. 2011 taxes 2013 Employee's Social Security Number (SSN) Statutory employee, Statutory employees. 2011 taxes 2013 Statutory nonemployee, Statutory nonemployees. 2011 taxes 2013 Students, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Suggestions for publication, Comments and suggestions. 2011 taxes 2013 Supplemental unemployment compensation benefits, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 T Tax help, How To Get Tax Help Tax Help, Tax help. 2011 taxes 2013 Taxes paid by employer, Employee's portion of taxes paid by employer. 2011 taxes 2013 Tips, 5. 2011 taxes 2013 Tips, Deposits. 2011 taxes 2013 Travel and business expenses, Travel and business expenses. 2011 taxes 2013 Trust fund recovery penalty, Trust fund recovery penalty. 2011 taxes 2013 W Wage and Tax Statement, 10. 2011 taxes 2013 Wage and Tax Statements Prev  Up     Home   More Online Publications